Social Security Disability

Defeating Zombie Trumpcare: The Fight To Protect Medicare And Medicaid Continues
Social Security Disability

Defeating Zombie Trumpcare: The Fight To Protect Medicare And Medicaid Continues

Defeating Zombie Trumpcare: The Fight To Protect Medicare And Medicaid Continues.
That’s what the American people voted for.
But now that he’s in the White House, Trump is championing the so-called “American Health Care Act” (AKA Trumpcare) which would be a massive violation of that promise.
Trumpcare would raid Medicare, gut Medicaid, and be an utter disaster for older Americans and Americans with disabilities.
Now they’ve made the bill even worse, gutting the Affordable Care Act’s protections for people with pre-existing conditions, to win the support of the far-right House Freedom Caucus.
Now is the time for everyone to call their House members and demand they vote no on Trumpcare, so that the bill never makes it out of the House.
That’s why are traveling around the country on our Hands Off Medicare and Medicaid Tour, looking for 3 Republican Senators to vote no on Trumpcare and any other reconciliation bill that includes cuts to Medicare, Medicaid, or Social Security.
Kokomo, Indiana is a somewhat typical American manufacturing city.
Cuts dedicated Medicare funding by $117.3 billion over the next decade Cuts federal funding for Medicaid by $880 billion over the next decade Increases insurance costs for older Americans 55-64 by as much as 750% Ends Medicaid’s new protections for older adults just below Medicare eligibility age by shifting costs of Medicaid expansion to the states Fundamentally threatens Medicaid’s protections for seniors and people with disabilities by taking away its guarantee and placing a per enrollee cap on federal funding Threatens Medicaid’s long-term care protections for seniors and people with disabilities, including those also receiving Medicare Removes critical funding for our national healthcare system to create a massive tax break for millionaires and billionaires Significantly increases all out-of-pocket healthcare costs for older adults just below Medicare eligibility age Paves the way for future, even more drastic cuts to Medicare and Medicaid Below are some of the senators who, for a variety of reasons, might vote no on Trumpcare.
Don’t stop calling, and getting others to call, until the bill is defeated!

Older Americans Month — slashing funds for our seniors is the wrong thing to do
Social Security Disability

Older Americans Month — slashing funds for our seniors is the wrong thing to do

Older Americans Month — slashing funds for our seniors is the wrong thing to do.
Yes, candidate Trump promised not to touch Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid.
President Trump champions the GOP’s American Health Care Act, which guts Medicaid, undermines the solvency of Medicare, and allows insurers to charge older Americans up to five times as much as people in their 20s.
Older Americans Month (originally named “Senior Citizens Month”) began in 1963 during the Kennedy administration amidst growing concern about our nation’s seniors.
Two years later, President Johnson signed Medicare and Medicaid and the Older Americans Act into law.
Yet, Budget Director Mulvaney dismissed the efficacy of Meals on Wheels, saying it “sounds great” but “we’re not going to spend [money] on programs that cannot show how that they actually deliver the promises that we’ve made to people.” Meals on Wheels is not the only imperiled Older Americans Act program under the Trump budget.
One out of every five senior citizens is trying to scrape by on an average income of just $8,300 a year.
During Older Americans Month, we will no doubt hear once again the myth that Social Security is going “bankrupt” and needs to be “reformed” (translation: raising the retirement age and cutting benefits for seniors, the disabled, and their families).
It may contain more granular detail about proposed cuts to Older Americans Act programs.
Max Richtman is president and CEO of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare.

Trump’s Tax Plan Is An Assault On Working Families
Social Security Disability

Trump’s Tax Plan Is An Assault On Working Families

Trump’s Tax Plan Is An Assault On Working Families.
Working American families need relief, American small businesses need help to compete in an increasingly global economy, and many of our nation’s wealthiest individuals use loopholes to avoid paying their fair share.
Congress needs to find bipartisan, workable solutions for genuine tax reform that help all Americans make ends meet, and I am ready to work with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to make that happen.
Out of the trillions of dollars in tax cuts that Trump proposed this week, nearly all of that money would end up in the pockets of America’s highest income households and corporations, like Trump and his family.
By any measure, the President’s tax plan proposes massive giveaways to high-income individuals.
The average income in my district for a family of four is just $34,000 annually, and only one percent of the families in my congressional district make over $200,000.
The Trump tax plan calls for reducing the corporate tax rate and “pass-through” tax rate to 15 percent, a proposal that helps wealthy corporations far more than the mom-and-pop businesses in Alabama’s 7th District.
But the elimination of programs like these does not even come close to paying for the $7 trillion in tax cuts proposed in Trump’s tax plan.
This tax plan isn’t just a missed opportunity, it actively works against reform by raising the deficit and laying the groundwork for damaging budget cuts.
Regardless of party, I believe that every lawmaker wants the best for their constituents and for the future of our country, because that is what brought me to Congress.

Five Ways Donald Trump Has Broken His Promise To Protect Social Security, Medicare And Medicaid In His First 100 Days
Social Security Disability

Five Ways Donald Trump Has Broken His Promise To Protect Social Security, Medicare And Medicaid In His First 100 Days

Five Ways Donald Trump Has Broken His Promise To Protect Social Security, Medicare And Medicaid In His First 100 Days.
Pence has a long record of attacking Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid.
Appointing Anti-Social Security Mick Mulvaney as Budget Director If Trump truly intended to keep his promise to protect Social Security and Medicare, he would be surrounding himself with people who support that goal.
He went so far as to say “they want to really cut [Social Security], and they want to cut it very substantially, the Republicans, and I’m not going to do that” and even called out Paul Ryan by name.
Trump said nothing.
Trump said nothing.
Still, Trump has said nothing.
He can make clear that Mulvaney and Price are not running the Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid show.
He can propose and push for the adequate funding of SSA and the part of HHS responsible for the administration of Medicare and Medicaid.
And most important, he can attack those in his party who propose dismantling these essential programs and tweet his continued commitment to them.

How WEP can affect a person’s Social Security
Social Security Disability

How WEP can affect a person’s Social Security

I am currently working and have worked for the last five years on a job that pays into Social Security.
At age 21 I started working for the federal government and didn’t pay into Social Security for 37 years.
So, first, it seems any Social Security benefits you receive will be affected by WEP (Windfall Elimination Provision) or GPO (Government Pension Offset), says Jim Blankenship, author of A Social Security Owner’s Manual.
To be affected by the WEP, an individual must have worked in covered employment long enough to qualify for Social Security benefits; must have also worked in non-covered employment, meaning that Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) Social Security payroll taxes were not paid; and, importantly, must have earned a pension in that noncovered job.
The GPO reduction is equal to two-thirds of the amount of the pension payment from noncovered government work.
“When you take your own Social Security benefit, your monthly benefit will be reduced (because of WEP) by the lesser of 50% of the Social Security benefit or $428,” says Blankenship.
In addition, when you file for your Social Security benefit, you will also be deemed to have filed for a spousal benefit based on your wife’s earnings record, says Blankenship.
“If your wife’s monthly benefit is more than double your benefit, this spousal benefit could increase your total Social Security benefit,” he says.
“However, since you’re receiving a pension from a government entity that was not subject to Social Security tax, any potential spousal benefit you might be eligible for will be reduced by a factor equal to two-thirds the amount of your pension.
Got questions about money?

Which state sends most taxes to DC? Hint: It’s not a state
Social Security Disability

Which state sends most taxes to DC? Hint: It’s not a state

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Tax Day approaches, show some love for the good people who live in the nation’s capital.
Washington, that swampy den of iniquity that politicians love to scorn, sends the most tax dollars per person to the U.S. government.
Last year, the District of Columbia paid Uncle Sam $37,000 per person in federal income, payroll and estate taxes. “The reason the District pays so much in taxes is that there are a lot of high-income people there.”
The IRS says millions of taxpayers have yet to file their returns.
The nation’s capital gets a good return on its tax investment.
For every dollar the District sends to the federal government, it gets back almost $4, according to a 2015 study by the New York state comptroller.
The closest state is Mississippi, which gets back $2.57 in federal spending for every dollar it sends to Washington.
So why do so many of these states that benefit from the federal government produce conservative politicians who complain that the government is too big?
Most states are winners when it comes to getting more money from the federal government than they pay in taxes.

Ask Larry: ​​Can My Wife Switch To Her Spousal Benefit?
Social Security Disability

Ask Larry: ​​Can My Wife Switch To Her Spousal Benefit?

Ask Larry: ​​Can My Wife Switch To Her Spousal Benefit?.
Hi Larry, my wife, who is two years older than me, filed for her retirement benefit at 62 when I was 60.
I will file for my retirement benefit when I reach my full retirement age (FRA) of 66 in early 2019.
When I file at my FRA, can my wife switch from her retirement benefit to her spousal benefit, which will entitle her to 50% of my monthly benefit?
If you were born on or before 1/1/1954, you could file for and receive your spousal benefit between your FRA and 70 when you’d file for your increased retirement benefit.
When will I be able to file for divorced spousal benefits on my ex’s record without it affecting the amount I will receive when I turn 66 and file for my own full retirement benefits?
Best, Larry Can I Suspend My Disability Benefit?
Hi Larry, I am 58, divorced (married 25 years), and have received a Social Security disability benefit since 2007.
However, at your full retirement age (FRA), your disability benefit will automatically convert to a standard retirement benefit, which you can then suspend until 70 to earn delayed retirement credits (DRCs) of 8% per year, calculated and applied monthly.
If your divorced spousal benefit is larger than your disability benefit, which is also what your retirement benefit will equal, it may be best to just collect your divorced spousal benefit beginning at your FRA.​ Our tool at www.maximizemysocialsecurity.com can sort all this out and suggest your best strategy with respect to suspending.

Taxation Of Social Security And SSDI Payments
Social Security Disability

Taxation Of Social Security And SSDI Payments

Depending on the amount of alternate income that you have in retirement and your filing status, you could owe taxes on up to 85% of your Social Security benefits.
This form tells you the total amount of your benefits but does not tell you if any of your benefits are taxable, or at what percentage.
However, you can get a reasonable estimate by combining half of your Social Security benefits with all other income (including tax-exempt interest) and comparing it to the base amounts that are excluded from tax.
Anything over the base amount may be taxable.
One-half of that total serves as your income for these calculations.
This is the total of most of the income boxes in lines 7-21 of your Form 1040 with the exception of non-taxable portions of pensions and annuities and tax-exempt interest (lines 8b, 15a, and 16a, respectively).
None of your benefits are taxable if the result is smaller than the base value for your filing status.
It will direct you to worksheets in other publications for special situations such as having combined IRA’s and a work-related retirement plan.
If you determine that you do have to pay taxes on your benefits, you can have federal taxes withheld from your benefit package or make periodic estimated payments of your tax to the IRS.
To avoid paying taxes pre-emptively on your Social Security benefits, run a series of calculations to find out the maximum income outside of Social Security that you can bring in without triggering the taxes.

Wall Street’s ‘Solution’ To Every Problem: Cut Social Security
Social Security Disability

Wall Street’s ‘Solution’ To Every Problem: Cut Social Security

Wall Street’s ‘Solution’ To Every Problem: Cut Social Security.
Indeed, the problem for which cutting Social Security is their solution sometimes actually contradicts another problem for which cutting Social Security is their solution.
Until recently, those determined to cut Social Security argued that everyone is living longer, so we must cut Social Security.
Now that supporters of Social Security have pointed out that not everyone is living longer, those determined to cut Social Security are starting to say: okay, not everyone is living longer, so we must cut Social Security.
Revealingly, the authors examine the impact of various cuts to Social Security on lifetime benefits, but not the impact of requiring the wealthy to pay more for their earned benefits.
Those who have seen their incomes and wealth skyrocket should be required to pay more for this increased spending, which will benefit us all.
A tipoff that the focus on Social Security and disparities in longevity is simply one more solution in search of a problem is that the analyses willfully refuse to see Social Security as the wage insurance that it is.
Those who turned age 62 last year and earned the maximum wage amount under Social Security — $118,500 in 2015 — received benefits that replaced 21.6 percent of those maximum wages.
Cutting its modest benefits is not the solution.
Indeed, the so-called solution is not even responsive to the problem.

Schumer Trolls Trump Tax Plan: You’re Doing It Wrong
Social Security Disability

Schumer Trolls Trump Tax Plan: You’re Doing It Wrong

Schumer Trolls Trump Tax Plan: You’re Doing It Wrong.
WASHINGTON ― Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) had a tart message for President Donald Trump on his tax reform proposal Thursday: You’re doing it wrong.
Schumer pulled out the old internet meme after Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said he couldn’t guarantee that the tax cuts would benefit the middle class.
The one-page outline of the plan released Tuesday would definitely represent a large cut for the wealthiest Americans.
“If on one piece of paper you can guarantee that the wealthy and special interests will pay less, but can’t guarantee that for the middle class, you’re doing it all wrong,” Schumer said.
“What President Trump unveiled yesterday is not the Trump tax plan, it is the plan to lower President Trump’s taxes, the taxes of his Cabinet and people as wealthy as they are,” Schumer said.
Republicans have hailed the president’s outline as the right path to reform the nation’s complicated tax laws, arguing that increased economic activity will offset any revenue lost due to the cuts.
But based on Trump’s campaign platform, the cuts could add some $8 trillion to the deficit, according to a New York Times tally.
Schumer suspected ill intent lies behind such a proposal from a party that complains about deficits when it comes to things like disaster relief and helping 9/11 responders, but not when it comes to giving the wealthy tax breaks.
“You can be sure a few years down the road that our Republican colleagues on the hard right will come to us and say the deficit is so big, we have to reduce Medicare and Social Security.” The Senate minority leader described Trump’s tax ideas as a “non-starter” for Democrats.