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Do You Have ‘Gaming Disorder,’ A Newly Recognized Mental Health Condition?
Social Security Disability

Do You Have ‘Gaming Disorder,’ A Newly Recognized Mental Health Condition?

Who believes that playing video games can become a mental health disorder? “Gaming disorder” isn’t a game or the name of a game.
Instead, the beta draft of the WHO’s forthcoming 11th update of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) now includes “gaming disorder” along with the following description: Gaming disorder is characterized by a pattern of persistent or recurrent gaming behaviour (‘digital gaming’ or ‘video-gaming’), which may be online (i.e., over the internet) or offline, manifested by: 1) impaired control over gaming (e.g., onset, frequency, intensity, duration, termination, context); 2) increasing priority given to gaming to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other life interests and daily activities; and 3) continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences.
The pattern of gaming behaviour may be continuous or episodic and recurrent.
Before you get too Madden about this, keep in mind that this is not saying that playing video games is a mental disorder.
Therefore, classifying an activity as a mental health condition is all about context.
Practically any activity, even those seemingly good and necessary, can become mental health issues when you no longer can control the activity and the activity starts interfering with your life.
The new ICD-11 classification is a reflection of how common video gaming and, in turn, video game addiction have become.
A brand of adult diapers.
Yes, apparently some video gamers are wearing diapers so that they don’t have to pause their Call of Duty when they are experiencing a call of dooty.

The History Of The Baby Name ‘Chicago’
Social Security Disability

The History Of The Baby Name ‘Chicago’

Kim Kardashian announced on Friday that she and Kanye West have named their new baby girl Chicago West.
The Social Security Administration only releases data for baby names that were given to at least five baby boys or five baby girls in a given year.
Seven boys were named Chicago in 1996 and 1998.
Five baby boys named Chicago were born in 2005, six in 2008 and seven in 2015.
It has never appeared in the public data for girls ― meaning that even if some American parents have chosen it for their daughters, the number of baby girls given that name in a year has always been fewer than five.
A follow-up tweet from Khloe Kardashian suggests baby Chicago will go by the nickname “Chi,” pronounced “shy.” The baby name Chi is marginally more popular than Chicago.
It appears in the SSA data for boys and girls as far back as 1970.
More recently, in 2016, nine baby girls were named Chi, and in 2015 and 2014, 10 baby girls were.
It has also appeared in the data for baby boys, with six boys named Chi in 2013, five in 2011, seven in 2009 and 2008, six in 2007, eight in 2006 and 2005, and nine in 2004.
In 2015, five baby girls were named North, and her nickname Nori has jumped up from 11 girls in 2013 to 168 in 2016.

65 City-Inspired Baby Names Parents Are Giving Their Newborns
Social Security Disability

65 City-Inspired Baby Names Parents Are Giving Their Newborns

Kim Kardashian announced Friday that she and Kanye West have named their new baby girl Chicago West.
The specific name Chicago is pretty rare, but city names in general aren’t uncommon in the U.S. From the classics like Paris and Austin to the less popular Miami and Zurich, many cities have found new life in the form of baby names.
We scoured the Social Security Administration’s most recent data to find more examples, based on the names of babies born in 2016.
Without further ado, here are 65 city names American parents gave their babies in 2016: Boston (414 boys, 49 girls) Memphis (428 boys, 92 girls) London (345 boys, 2,339 girls) Brooklyn (68 boys, 5,922 girls) Paris (80 boys, 1,152 girls) Houston (285 boys, 10 girls) Austin (5,334 boys, 116 girls) Geneva (194 girls) Juneau (10 girls) Sydney (46 boys, 2,309 girls) Siena (475 girls) Oslo (12 boys) Camden (3,322 boys, 156 girls) Vienna (290 girls) Madrid (five girls) Trenton (815 boys) Hudson (6,098 boys, 127 girls) Verona (22 girls) Albany (20 girls) Ravenna (21 girls) Charleston (64 boys, 154 girls) Brighton (121 boys, 100 girls) Phoenix (1,226 boys, 719 girls) Savannah (5,336 girls) Florence (246 girls) Providence (12 girls) Bristol (15 boys, 585 girls) Madison (42 boys, 8,982 girls) Kingston (3,109 boys, 15 girls) Alexandria (1,460 girls) Havana (54 girls) Adelaide (1,227 girls) Berlin (five boys, 75 girls) Vegas (five boys) Odessa (76 girls) Darby (17 boys, 120 girls) Sedona (64 girls) Santiago (3,700 boys, 13 girls) Miami (18 girls) Nairobi (21 girls) Jackson (11,210 boys, 25 girls) Salem (147 boys, 184 girls) Orlando (430 boys) Valencia (112 girls) Lourdes (99 girls) Dallas (1218 boys, 479 girls) Rio (132 boys, 61 girls) Cairo (266 boys, 16 girls) Montreal (seven boys) Olympia (51 girls) Macon (32 boys) Raleigh (89 boys, 168 girls) Rome (142 boys, 16 girls) Venice (seven boys, 37 girls) Augusta (seven boys, 25 girls) Milan (685 boys, 376 girls) Doha (six girls) Cheyenne (five boys, 802 girls) Zurich (five boys) Dayton (242 boys, 22 girls) Denver (268 boys, 180 girls) Richmond (24 boys) Carmel (seven boys, eight girls) Cleveland (23 boys) York (12 boys)

Employer can’t claw back mistaken payment to attorney: Court
Welfare

Employer can’t claw back mistaken payment to attorney: Court

Section 440 of the Pennsylvania Workers’ Compensation Act provides that an employee in a workers compensation case is entitled to attorneys fees when an insurer unreasonably contests its liability under the statute, according to the ruling released Thursday in County of Allegheny v. Workers’ Compensation Appeal Board.
The employer, Allegheny County, was ordered to pay $14,750 in attorneys fees under Section 440 after the Workers’ Compensation Appeal Board determined that the county unreasonably contested its liability.
After that, the county filed a separate petition before a workers compensation judge in which it sought reimbursement of the erroneously awarded attorneys fees from the employee’s counsel, according to the ruling.
But the state Supreme Court found that the General Assembly, in enacting the Workers’ Compensation Act, did not provide any mechanism by which employers can recoup erroneously awarded counsel fees once paid.
Because such an order was requested and denied in this case, requiring the appellee to pay the awarded attorneys fees, and there is no statutory provision authorizing reimbursement if the award is reversed, the Supreme Court held that the county may not recoup the already paid attorneys fees from the employee’s counsel.
The Supreme Court vacated the Commonwealth Court’s order and reinstated the order of the Workers’ Compensation Appeal Board, which affirmed the denial of the county’s reimbursement petition.
“This was a unanimous decision, which is unusual for this court, and the decision was rendered within three months of oral argument, which is really fast.
They clearly knew the Commonwealth Court made an error.
All the court was doing was returning us to status quo because the law has always been and should always be that lawyers do not have to return their unreasonable contest fees.
If we had to give back those fees, there would be a chilling effect.” The attorney for the county could not be immediately reached for comment.

President Trump Revokes Obama-Era Planned Parenthood Protections
Welfare

President Trump Revokes Obama-Era Planned Parenthood Protections

(WASHINGTON/NEW YORK) – U.S. health officials on Friday said they were revoking legal guidance issued by the Obama Administration that had sought to discourage states from trying to defund organizations that provide abortion services, such as Planned Parenthood.
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) officials also said the department is issuing a new regulation aimed at protecting healthcare workers’ civil rights based on religious and conscience objections.
On Thursday, HHS said it was creating a new division that would focus on conscience and religious objections, a move it said was necessary after years of the federal government forcing healthcare workers to provide such services.
HHS will issue a letter on Friday to state Medicaid offices that will rescind the Obama Administration’s 2016 guidance, which was issued after states including Indiana had tried to defund abortion providers such as Planned Parenthood.
The guidance “restricted states’ ability to take certain actions against family-planning providers that offer abortion services,” HHS said in a statement.
The Medicaid program, jointly funded by states and the federal government, provides healthcare services to the poor and disabled.
Federal law prohibits Medicaid or any other federal funding for abortion services.
Dawn Laguens, executive vice president for the Planned Parenthood Action Fund, said the move encourages states to try to block access to care at Planned Parenthood.
The rule will enforce existing statutes that guarantee these civil rights.
When asked by reporters if the rule would allow providers to deny care to transgender individuals based on religious objections, Severino said the rule refers to statutes that are based on providing procedures.

Consumer Sentiment Slides for Third-Straight Month — 2nd Update
Unemployment

Consumer Sentiment Slides for Third-Straight Month — 2nd Update

A measure of U.S. consumer sentiment slid in January for the third-straight month, continuing to ease after reaching its highest level in more than a decade.
The University of Michigan on Friday said its consumer sentiment index was 94.4 in early January, down slightly from 95.9 in December.
Economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal had expected an increase in the index, a reading of 97.0 for January.
Consumers have been upbeat this year in multiple measures, buoyed by strong economic growth, low unemployment, and rising wealth related to property values and repeated stock market highs.
Still, consumers viewed current economic conditions less favorably this month.
This disconnect largely occurred because of uncertainties about the longer-term impact of the changes on consumers, said Richard Curtin, the survey’s chief economist.
Those tax cuts expire after 2027, though most households would likely still see little effect on their take-home pay then. “Some of the uncertainty is related to how much a cut or an increase people, especially high income households who live in high-tax states, face,” Mr. Curtin said.
Friday’s report also showed household expectations about long-term rising prices remained at its 2017 average, but inflation expectations over the next year inched up slightly to 2.8% in January from 2.7% in December. “Inflation expectations had been beginning to trend a little higher over the past six months or so,” Mr. Pearce said.

Cleaning company owner pleads guilty to workers comp fraud
Welfare

Cleaning company owner pleads guilty to workers comp fraud

The Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation on Friday said the owner of a Hudson, Ohio-based cleaning business must serve 30 days under house arrest and pay $14,000 in restitution to the bureau after pleading guilty to workers comp fraud.
Amanda Joy Klapp, owner of Amanda Joy’s Cleaning Co., has had employees since 2013 but didn’t secure Ohio BWC coverage until 2015, intentionally underreporting payroll to avoid paying a higher premium.
She attempted to take out a new policy using her husband’s name to avoid paying the balance owed on her original policy after she stopped paying premiums and the policy lapsed, according the bureau’s special investigations department.
Ms. Klapp pleaded guilty on Jan. 9 to three first-degree misdemeanor counts of workers comp fraud in Stow Municipal Court in Summit County, Ohio.
She was fined $500 on each count.
Ms. Klapp must also bring her BWC coverage into compliance within 30 days and pay $750 in fines, the bureau said in a statement.

US jobless claims fall to 45-year low
Unemployment

US jobless claims fall to 45-year low

Express Employment Professionals CEO Bob Funk on the company planning bonuses for its non-executive employees because of the tax reform legislation.
WASHINGTON, Jan 18 (Reuters) – The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits fell more than expected last week to the lowest level in 45 years, but the decline likely overstated the health of the labor market as data for several states were estimated.
Claims for the prior week were unrevised.
Claims had increased over the previous four weeks, with economists blaming difficulties adjusting the data for seasonal fluctuations around moving holidays and unseasonably cold weather.
The Labor Department said claims for California, Arkansas, Kentucky, Maine, Hawaii, Virginia and Wyoming were estimated.
The four-week average of claims rose 8,500 between the December and January survey periods, suggesting some moderation in the pace of job growth.
Job growth is slowing as the labor market nears full employment.
There has been an increase in companies reporting difficulties finding qualified workers.
Thursday’s claims report also showed the number of people receiving benefits after an initial week of aid increased 76,000 to 1.95 million in the week ended Jan. 6.
The four-week moving average of the so-called continuing claims gained 4,000 to 1.92 million.

Consumer Sentiment Slides for Third-Straight Month — Update
Unemployment

Consumer Sentiment Slides for Third-Straight Month — Update

A measure of U.S. consumer sentiment slid in January for the third-straight month, continuing to ease after reaching its highest level in more than a decade.
The University of Michigan on Friday said its consumer sentiment index was 94.4 in early January, down slightly from 95.9 in December.
Economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal had expected a preliminary reading of 97.0 for January.
Consumers have been upbeat this year in multiple measures, buoyed by strong economic growth, low unemployment, and rising wealth related to property values and repeated stock market highs. “Importantly, the survey recorded persistent strength in personal finances and buying plans.”
The consumers’ expectations portion of the survey moved up only slightly despite the fact that most respondents who mentioned the recently-passed tax overhaul thought its impact would be positive.
This disconnect largely occurred because of uncertainties about the longer-term impact of the changes on consumers, Mr. Curtin said. “Some of the uncertainty is related to how much a cut or an increase people, especially high income households who live in high-tax states, face,” he said.
Friday’s report also showed household expectations about long-term rising prices remained at its 2017 average, but inflation expectations over the next year inched up slightly to 2.8% in January from 2.7% in December.
Write to Sharon Nunn at sharon.nunn@wsj.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires January 19, 2018 11:02 ET (16:02 GMT)

LETTER: Don’t allow cuts to safety net programs
Welfare

LETTER: Don’t allow cuts to safety net programs

Thanks to the Asbury Park Press and reporter Amanda Oglesby for highlighting hunger and the need for food assistance in Monmouth and Ocean counties, especially among elderly and disabled residents and children.
(“Feeding your neighbors: Jersey Shore food pantries see growing need,” Dec. 15).
As the story notes, food banks and pantries simply cannot meet the growing need for food.
That’s why the Supplemental Assistance Nutrition Program (SNAP, also known as food stamps) is critical to fight hunger in these counties and across the state.
Yet, as we celebrate the holiday season, Congress is moving to approve a deficit-escalating tax plan that will almost certainly lead to cuts to SNAP and other essential safety net assistance.
This will hurt the roughly 69,000 Ocean and Monmouth households that rely on SNAP to put food on their tables.
Ocean and Monmouth are covered by four congressional districts where nearly 229,000 people face hunger, according to #SNAPFeedsNJ fact sheets the New Jersey Anti-Hunger Coalition released this fall.
SNAP is one of the most cost-effective ways to fight both hunger and poverty.
We urge Congressmen Chris Smith, Frank LoBiondo, Tom MacArthur and Frank Pallone, who represent Monmouth and Ocean counties, to oppose harmful cuts to food assistance that will leave tens of thousands of their constituents without enough to eat.
Adele LaTourettte Director, New Jersey Anti-Hunger Coalition