Tag: Bill Nelson

Same old, same old and 6 other takeaways on Trump’s budget
Social Security Disability

Same old, same old and 6 other takeaways on Trump’s budget

Unveiled Monday, the $4.4 trillion spending plan now heads to the GOP-controlled Congress where it’s expected to get a cool reception even from key Republican lawmakers who already rejected many of the same cuts proposed in the president’s 2018 budget plan Trump proposed last year.
In addition, Senate Democrats are likely to fight Trump’s decision not to recommend funding domestic programs as much as a recently negotiated congressional spending deal would allow.
The plan also proposes deep domestic cuts to health assistance, foreign aid, and housing programs and slashes state grants for education, the environment and community redevelopment.
While Trump promised during his presidential run not to cut Medicare, Medicaid or Social Security, he continues to propose changes to those programs.
In addition to seeking major savings in Medicaid for the second year in a row, Trump also wants to find more than $554 billion in Medicare savings.
Programs for poor take a hit As he did last year, Trump is proposing major cuts in safety-net programs.
The budget proposal also axes a grant program for states used to support social services such as child care assistance.
It would also end after two years the private insurance subsidies for people who don’t get coverage through a government program or an employer, while giving states grants to develop their own programs.
More: Trump budget proposes again to cut federal funding for Amtrak in half, which Congress has rejected The budget deal made a difference The congressional budget deal that lifted spending caps known as the “sequester” that Congress imposed in 2011 seems to already be making a difference.
Both defense and non-defense spending would see a boost in Trump’s proposal, though the president is not proposing to spend as much as the caps allow because of the increase to the national debt.

Seven takeaways from Trump’s 2019 budget proposal
Welfare

Seven takeaways from Trump’s 2019 budget proposal

Unveiled Monday, the $4.4 trillion spending plan now heads to the GOP-controlled Congress where it’s expected to get a cool reception even from key Republican lawmakers who already rejected many of the same cuts proposed in the president’s 2018 budget plan Trump proposed last year.
In addition, Senate Democrats are likely to fight Trump’s decision not to recommend funding domestic programs as much as a recently negotiated congressional spending deal would allow.
The plan also proposes deep domestic cuts to health assistance, foreign aid, and housing programs and slashes state grants for education, the environment and community redevelopment.
While Trump promised during his presidential run not to cut Medicare, Medicaid or Social Security, he continues to propose changes to those programs.
In addition to seeking major savings in Medicaid for the second year in a row, Trump also wants to find more than $554 billion in Medicare savings.
Programs for poor take a hit As he did last year, Trump is proposing major cuts in safety-net programs.
The budget proposal also axes a grant program for states used to support social services such as child care assistance.
It would also end after two years the private insurance subsidies for people who don’t get coverage through a government program or an employer, while giving states grants to develop their own programs.
More: Trump budget proposes again to cut federal funding for Amtrak in half, which Congress has rejected The budget deal made a difference The congressional budget deal that lifted spending caps known as the “sequester” that Congress imposed in 2011 seems to already be making a difference.
Both defense and non-defense spending would see a boost in Trump’s proposal, though the president is not proposing to spend as much as the caps allow because of the increase to the national debt.

First Rick Scott, now Bill Nelson, zapping White House for Zika help
Welfare

First Rick Scott, now Bill Nelson, zapping White House for Zika help

First Rick Scott, now Bill Nelson, zapping White House for Zika help.
Rick Scott chided the Obama administration for not providing the state with enough resources to combat the Zika virus.
The funds are also used to educate health providers about how to identify Zika, provide local health agencies with testing kits, supply laboratories with diagnostic tests, advise travelers about how to best protect themselves against Zika, and inform the public about the public health threat.
“Families in Florida and throughout the country deserve better.” Last year, more than 1,400 cases of Zika were reported in Florida by the state Department of Health, more than any other state.
Last year, Scott not only blasted the Obama administration for failing to give the state enough help to fight Zika, but he also accused Nelson of abandoning his constituents in voting against a controversial Zika spending bill that included a number of unrelated provisions Democrats found objectionable.
Rubio, Buchanan want hurricane help With the official kickoff of hurricane season, congressional lawmakers from the Sunshine State are pressing the Trump administration to help prepare Floridians for the worst.
“Floridians are eager to see Washington, D.C., refocus and refine the government’s disaster relief mission to ensure that meeting victims’ needs is always the immediate priority.” If a major storm hits, for example, the senator wants the Department of Veterans Affairs to make sure veterans living in rural areas like Florida’s Panhandle don’t have to wait to access private health care if they can’t get to a VA medical facility.
Trump has nominated Brock Long, the former head of the Alabama Emergency Management Agency, to run FEMA but the Senate has yet to confirm him.
The Trump administration needs to get their NOAA and FEMA chiefs on the job quickly because we don’t know when the next big storm is going to hit.” Weatherford one to watch The head of a prominent Washington think tank believes former Florida House Speaker Will Weatherford is someone to watch in the future.
And he’s going to come back.” If he is, it probably won’t be next year.