Tag: Disability

What Medicaid’s Work Requirement Means For Seniors, People With Disabilities, And Their Caregivers
Social Security Disability

What Medicaid’s Work Requirement Means For Seniors, People With Disabilities, And Their Caregivers

The Trump Administration announced last week that it will allow states to require Medicaid recipients to work, take job training, or do community service to stay eligible for the program, which provides both medical and long-term care services for people with low incomes.
What will the requirement mean for older adults, younger people with disabilities, or their family caregivers?
The Trump Administration would leave their Medicaid eligibility up to the states.
That’s not unusual: One-quarter of family caregivers say they spend 40 hours a week helping relatives.
Children qualify if they are under age 19, students under age 24, or if they are “permanently or totally disabled.” They must also live with their caregiver for at least half the year.
Who is a dependent?
In Kentucky, because her parents may not meet the definition of a dependent, she may be subject to the work requirement.
According to its proposal, “caregiving services for a non-dependent relative or other person with a disabling medical condition” satisfy the 80 hours per month work requirement.
But Kentucky’s caregiving exception may not apply in other states that impose work requirements.
Most who can work, already do.

Philip Hammond causes storm with remarks about disabled workers
Unemployment

Philip Hammond causes storm with remarks about disabled workers

Play Video 1:15 Disability charity Scope called on Philip Hammond to withdraw his “totally unacceptable and derogatory comments” after he said Britain’s sluggish productivity could partly be blamed on more disabled people in the workforce .
At first, he responded saying that high levels of unemployment, particularly youth unemployment, “will be felt for many many years to come”.
He then added: “It is almost certainly the case that by increasing participation in the workforce, including far higher levels of participation by marginal groups and very high levels of engagement in the workforce, for example of disabled people – something we should be extremely proud of – may have had an impact on overall productivity measurements.” Anna Bird, the director of policy and research at Scope, said: “These comments are totally unacceptable and derogatory.
They fundamentally undermine the government’s policy to get more disabled people into work, and the ambition set out by the prime minister just a week ago.” She added: “The chancellor must urgently withdraw them and offer a full apology.” There are 7 million people of working age in the UK who have a disability, or health condition but only 47.6% of disabled adults are employed, compared with 79.2% of non-disabled people, the latest figures show.
This is despite the law being clear that people with disabilities should not be discriminated against when seeking employment.
On Twitter, he said: “Chancellor just linked low productivity growth to the labour market and specified the increased employment of disabled people.
“My experience of employing disabled people is that they are brilliant employees.
The chancellor’s comments are ignorant.” (@Marshadecordova) Shocking that Philip Hammond is trying to blame disabled people for low productivity!
Disabled people contribute enormously and disability employment gap has barely changed since productivity started to stall.
Disgusting scapegoating!

Philip Hammond blames low productivity on disabled workers
Unemployment

Philip Hammond blames low productivity on disabled workers

Toby Melville/Reuters Philip Hammond called “ignorant” after suggesting low productivity rates were because of more disabled people working.
The chancellor told the Treasury Select Committee that more disabled people working “may have had an impact” on productivity.
The chancellor told MPs at the Treasury Select Committee that “very high levels of engagement in the workforce” of disabled people “may have had an impact on overall productivity measurements.”
Labour MP John Mann, a member of the committee, said the remarks were “appalling” and “ignorant” in a tweet.
Chancellor just linked low productivity growth to the labour market and specified the increased employment of disabled people.
The chancellor’s comments are ignorant.”
The fall came despite more people being in work and working more hours.
The government aims to get one million more disabled people into work over the course of a 10-year plan, halving the difference between employment rates for disabled and non-disabled people, which stood at 32% in 2016.
Labour’s shadow disabilities minister Marsha de Cordova tweeted that it was “shocking that Philip Hammond is trying to blame disabled people for low productivity! “Disabled people contribute enormously and disability employment gap has barely changed since productivity started to stall.

Do You Qualify for Social Security Disability?
Social Security Disability

Do You Qualify for Social Security Disability?

Social Security disability has different requirements to qualify than the agency’s retirement benefits.
You may qualify for disability benefits even if you have nowhere near enough work credits to get retirement benefits from Social Security.
Social Security work credits The Social Security Administration uses “work credits” as its benchmark to determine who is eligible for many of its programs, including disability benefits.
Unlike retirement benefits, you might need to get disability benefits while still young — so the work credit requirement takes age into account when determining whether or not someone can get disability benefits.
Thus, assuming you make more than $5,200 per year, to qualify for Social Security disability at age 35 you’d need approximately five years’ worth of earnings on your work record.
First, the person must not be able to do the work that he was doing before.
How to apply for disability benefits Before applying for benefits, take a look at the Social Security disability checklist to make sure that you have all the information and documents you’ll need.
If the agency rejected your application because your condition doesn’t qualify as disabling, you can file an appeal on the Social Security website.
If you don’t have enough work credits to qualify for disability benefits, you may be able to get benefits from the Supplemental Security Income program instead.
Before buying such a policy, check the fine print to see what you’ll need to do to qualify as disabled because some policies are even more limiting than the Social Security Administration in their definition of disability, while others are quite lenient.

Concern over high unemployment rate for Kiwis with disabilities
Unemployment

Concern over high unemployment rate for Kiwis with disabilities

The Disability Rights Commissioner says she’s deeply concerned by the number of disabled Kiwis out of work.
Forty-two percent of young disabled New Zealanders are out of employment, education or training, while only 25.2 percent of all disabled Kiwis of working age are employed or looking for work. “I tried for so many years to get a job,” says Ms Niu. “They just saw a person in a wheelchair and they didn’t know what I was capable of.”
Ms Niu is thought to be one of the only people in a wheelchair working in a service station in New Zealand.
Ms Niu says working has motivated her in other areas of her life.
She’s lost 80kg and her confidence has improved.
Ms Tesoriero says there are benefits in employing people with disabilities. “They’re loyal and stay in jobs longer than other people in the workforce.
Newshub.

Will Social Security Cover You if You Become Disabled?
Social Security Disability

Will Social Security Cover You if You Become Disabled?

In fact, there are two separate programs you could potentially receive income from if you’re too disabled to work: Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance.
The difficulty in becoming eligible for benefits means Social Security Disability may not cover you if something goes wrong.
Your options for Social Security Disability benefits Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) is a dedicated program aimed at providing protection for long-term disabled workers.
If you’ve earned a sufficient number of work credits at the time of your disability — the number varies based on age — SSDI is the benefits program to turn to if you’re disabled.
If you don’t qualify for SSDI because you haven’t earned enough work credits, you may be eligible to receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) if you’re disabled.
When can you get disability benefits?
You’ll also need to show that you meet the SSA’s very strict definition of disabled.
The SSA provides disability income only to the most severely disabled workers, so to become eligible for benefits, you’ll need to: Have a disability that has lasted a year, will last a year, or will end in your death.
Unfortunately for many workers, Social Security is the only option for disability income.
If you aren’t able to get covered on your own and you believe you have a qualifying condition, getting legal help could be your best course of action.

Social Security Administration Seeks Shortcut Through Massive Disability Backlog
Social Security Disability

Social Security Administration Seeks Shortcut Through Massive Disability Backlog

WASHINGTON — The Social Security Administration is quietly changing how it handles some appeals from Americans who’ve sought disability benefits.
“For some people this results in a wait of over 17 months to receive a hearing decision, which we concede is unacceptable service.” If someone can’t keep working because of a serious illness or injury, that person can apply for monthly benefits under the Social Security Disability Insurance program.
Now, these remands will instead be heard at the council level by administrative appeals judges who don’t have the same independence from the SSA that administrative law judges do.
Another 10,000 or so cases being taken away from ALJs include situations where people have returned to work after receiving disability benefits and the agency believes they’ve been overpaid.
Administrative law judges work for government agencies, though they are supposed to be shielded from agency pressures by a federal law called the Administrative Procedure Act.
“But we’re also very concerned about claimants getting a hearing in front of an administrative law judge that has qualified judicial independence as required by the Administrative Procedure Act.” Still, Ekman said the 1 million people waiting for the government to decide whether they qualify for benefits shouldn’t be made to wait.
“Claimants die while they’re waiting to get a hearing.
“What the Social Security Administration plans to do now is to divert subsets of cases from hearings before ALJs to hearings before their own handpicked people.” Hinkle said the SSA owes it to the public to do whatever it can to reduce the wait time, and that administrative appeals judges can help with that.
“This strategy neither favors administrative appeals judges nor disfavors administrative law judges – it favors the many people waiting for a hearing decision,” Hinkle said in an email.
As part of a general strategy to reduce the backlog, the agency has been trying to hire more administrative law judges.

Disabled forced to wait years for benefits
Social Security Disability

Disabled forced to wait years for benefits

There are many individuals, however, who face obstacles in reaching this opportunity because of their disability.
These individuals have just as strong a desire to be self-sufficient as individuals without disabilities, but desire alone is not enough; the labor force participation rate for people with disabilities is just over 20 percent, compared to nearly 70 percent for people without disabilities.
One avenue for self-empowerment is the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program.
Unfortunately, former workers with disabilities face bureaucratic barriers to getting these benefits.
One barrier is particularly concerning: a massive backlog of nearly 1.1 million people waiting for a Social Security Disability Insurance hearing.
After up to a year in the initial processes, applicants for disability benefits have to wait an average of 596 days for a hearing decision from an administrative law judge to learn if they will receive SSDI benefits.
This difficult and frustrating process makes it next to impossible for most applicants to focus on getting better or working again.
The Social Security Administration (SSA) has estimated that 8,600 people died in fiscal 2016 while waiting for a disability hearing.
The number of people waiting has increased 58 percent, up from 705,000 since fiscal year 2010.
Disabled, and trapped in a bureaucratic backlog Helena Berger is president and CEO of the American Association of People with Disabilities.

Compassionate Allowances: Fast-Track Help to Those Who Need It Most
Social Security Disability

Compassionate Allowances: Fast-Track Help to Those Who Need It Most

We are committed to processing disability claims as quickly as possible in all cases, but our initial claims process typically takes three to four months.
If you suffer from a serious medical condition that prevents you from working, time is of the essence when it comes to receiving a decision on your disability application.
In some cases, we’re able to expedite the application process through our Compassionate Allowances program.
Social Security uses Compassionate Allowances to identify people whose medical condition is so severe that they obviously meet our disability standards.
Under the Social Security Act, we consider you disabled if you can’t work due to a severe medical condition that is expected to last at least one year, or result in death.
Many of the claims in our Compassionate Allowances Program are approved based on medical confirmation of the diagnosis alone; for example, pancreatic cancer, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and acute leukemia.
Acting Commissioner Nancy A. Berryhill said it best: “Social Security is committed — now and in the future – to continue to identify and fast-track diseases that are certain or near-certain to be approved for disability benefits.” Today, almost 500,000 people with severe disabilities have been approved through this fast-track disability process, which has grown to include a total of 228 conditions.
Our Compassionate Allowances program speeds help to people with severe conditions.
If you or someone you know has a severe disabling condition, don’t wait.
Go to our Compassionate Allowances website for more information about the program, including a list of all the conditions.

Organic Alternatives owner settles with feds for $200K over disability payments
Social Security Disability

Organic Alternatives owner settles with feds for $200K over disability payments

Austin Humphreys Steve Ackerman, owner of Organic Alternatives marijuana dispensary, paid a $200,000 settlement to the federal government over his Social Security Disability Income, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.
The Department of Justice alleged that Ackerman failed to report “substantial gainful activity” from his ownership and operation of Organic Alternatives that would have made him ineligible for monthly disability payments.
The department couldn’t say Tuesday afternoon how much of the settlement was repayment to the government and how much was punitive.
U.S. Attorney’s Office spokesperson Jeff Dorschner said it was deemed “a fair and accurate way to handle the loss experienced by the U.S.
government.”
He said he didn’t want to spend the time, money and energy to fight it in court. “I think that’s a good thing.
The government contends Ackerman failed to accurately report his work activity starting in January 2011 — the same year a campaign to ban medical marijuana dispensaries from Fort Collins was gearing up.
The ban was rescinded in the November 2012 election, allowing the dispensary to reopen.
The government terminated Ackerman’s benefits retroactively to July 1, 2013, as part of the settlement.