Tag: Family

The best cities in America to build a career while raising a family
Unemployment

The best cities in America to build a career while raising a family

Shutterstock/Page Light Studios Some of the best places to live in the US are well-suited for working parents.
Personal finance company SmartAsset found the top 10 cities to build a career while raising a family.
Naturally, some cities in the United States are better suited for working parents than others.
Personal finance company SmartAsset rated each US city this week and found the 10 best cities where parents can build their careers while raising their families.
Median annual housing costs, according to the American Community Survey.
Violent crime rate, or the number of crimes per 100,000 residents, according to the FBI Uniform Crime Reporting Program High school graduation rate, according to US Department of Education data.
State policy benefitting working parents, according to the National Partnership for Women & Families Annual childcare costs, or the average annual cost of full-time center-based childcare for children up to age 4.
The results showed a clear preference toward small towns and medium-size cities far from the East Coast: Three inland states — Utah, Texas, and Iowa — contained seven of the top 10 cities.
SmartAsset said northeastern cities tended to be weighed down by high childcare and housing costs, and the highest-ranking northeastern city on the list, Newton, Massachusetts, didn’t even crack the top 100.
Read on to see the 10 best cities for working parents.

Farm groups see Trump budget as a blow to family farmers
Welfare

Farm groups see Trump budget as a blow to family farmers

WASHINGTON – With a budget touted as “Efficient, Effective, Accountable,” the White House released its proposed fiscal year 2019 budget on Feb. 12 — a proposed $4.4 trillion budget with deep cuts to domestic programs.
Requesting a 16 percent decrease from 2017 levels, $47 billion in cuts over 10 years were listed in the budget, including cuts in crop insurance and other farm programs.
The cuts would also include reducing federal crop insurance subsidies, cutting spending for conservation programs and foreign food aid and slashing more than $17 billion from funds available to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), or food stamps, over the next 10 years.
The NFU said, over the next decade, the $4.4 trillion budget would “severely cut many programs that family farmers and ranchers and rural Americans rely on,” including $48.6 billion from Farm Bill programs, $3.7 billion from the USDA, $213 billion from SNAP, $554 billion from Medicare and $250 billion from Medicaid.
“The proposed cuts in crop insurance and farm programs make this budget a non-starter.
(Photo: Contributed/American Soybean Association) “As the farm economy continues to struggle in its recovery, farmers cannot afford these backbreaking cuts.
“The President has proposed again to eliminate or shrink many programs that serve rural America, including those supporting rural businesses, cooperatives, and housing,” said Center for Rural Affairs policy associate Anna Johnson.
“The President is also calling for an investment of $50 billion in rural infrastructure, but this could put the onus on states already struggling with the economic fallout of depressed commodity prices.” In addition, Trump’s budget slashes working lands conservation programs by proposing the elimination of the Conservation Stewardship Program, according to the Center for Rural Affairs.
This competitive advantage for large farms has contributed to farm consolidation and shrinking rural communities.” Johnson said President Trump’s budget proposal would drain support for rural America.
Perdue, and their teams to cease these actions that undercut rural Americans and rural communities.” Infrastructure plan Trump met with state and local leaders on Monday to discuss his administration’s infrastructure plan.

5 Ways Social Security Protects You and Your Family
Social Security Disability

5 Ways Social Security Protects You and Your Family

As you prepare for a financially secure future, you should know about these five benefits that you, your spouse, and your children may become eligible for through Social Security: Retirement benefits provide you with a continuous source of income later in life.
If you’ve earned enough credits, you can start receiving your full retirement benefits at age 66 or 67 — depending on when you were born.
Learn more at: www.socialsecurity.gov/disability.
Child benefits support your minor children while you’re receiving Social Security retirement benefits or disability benefits.
This financial support also is available to adult children who become disabled before age 22.
Grandchildren and stepchildren may qualify in certain situations.
Spousal benefits supplement a couple’s income if one of the two never worked or had low lifetime earnings.
It’s likely the survivor benefits you have under Social Security carry greater value than your individual life-insurance policy.
Currently, Social Security provides benefits to more than 66 million American workers and their families.
Learn more about all of our programs at www.socialsecurity.gov.

‘It’s paycheck to the day after:’ Family hopes education can break the cycle of poverty
Welfare

‘It’s paycheck to the day after:’ Family hopes education can break the cycle of poverty

Despite the financial challenges, Ramsburg is determined to give her children a better future through a focus on their education.
A person who ceases their education with a high school degree or equivalent in Hanover is almost eight times more likely to live below the poverty level than someone who finishes college, according to census data.
Her older two children — Kiana Shifflett, 17, and Zachary Shifflett, 15 — attend the Milton Hershey School, a cost-free, private boarding school for low-income families in Hershey.
It is the family’s hope that the kids’ education at Milton Hershey will propel them to pursue a college education and break the cycle of poverty.
The poverty line for a family of four with three children under 18 is about $24,000.
Ramsburg has lived in the New Oxford motel for about six months after staying with a family member in Hanover who moved.
This is what’s going on,’” Ramsburg said.
The family was hit hardest financially when Ramsburg lost her job about two weeks into her pregnancy with James.
She struggled to find a job during that time, and the family moved constantly.
She and Zachary come home to visit their mom about once a month.

U.S. Families’ Wealth, Incomes Rose, Fed Survey Says — 2nd Update
Unemployment

U.S. Families’ Wealth, Incomes Rose, Fed Survey Says — 2nd Update

The report also found that minority households and families with less education had larger proportional gains in income than other families between 2013 and 2016, suggesting the fruits of the recovery spread to a wider swath of society.
Despite that improvement, more educated families continued to have higher incomes overall.
A Fed economist noted that the level of wealth and income of black and Hispanic households is very low compared with other groups, so while they did experience large gains proportionally, the gaps between white and nonwhite households are very large.
Minority households and families with less education had larger proportional gains in income than others between 2013 and 2016, suggesting the fruits of the recovery spread to a wider swath of society, the Fed said.
The top 1% of households took home nearly a quarter of total income last year, 23.8%, up from 20.3% in 2013.
Despite that improvement, more educated families continued to have higher incomes and wealth overall.
A Fed economist noted that the levels of income and wealth of black and Hispanic households is very low compared with other groups, so while they experienced large gains proportionally, the gaps between white and nonwhite households are very large.
The median incomes of black families rose 10%, while those of Hispanic households increased 15%, the Fed said.
White households had median net worth of $171,000 in 2016, compared with $17,600 for black or African-American non-Hispanic households and $20,700 for Hispanic or Latino families, the Fed said.

What Your Grandchild Can Teach You About Social Security
Social Security Disability

What Your Grandchild Can Teach You About Social Security

What Your Grandchild Can Teach You About Social Security.
If using the internet feels like a challenge, let your grandchild be your guide.
Take advantage of your grandchild’s computer skills and navigate Social Security’s website together!
Once your grandchild has explained the basics of going online, you can use our website to find information and services for everything from benefit planning, to filing online, to replacing your lost Medicare card.
Your grandchild can help you navigate to www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount to set one up.
To apply for survivors benefits, you or your family will need to contact us by phone or visit an office.
Once you’re receiving benefits and have an account, you can continue to do business with us online with your my Social Security account.
You can get a benefit verification letter, change your address or phone number, start or change direct deposit, get a replacement SSA-1099 for tax purposes, or check your benefits.
In the District of Columbia and many states, you may be able to request a replacement Social Security card online.
Make a date with your grandchild to visit www.socialsecurity.gov together.

How The GOP’s Health Plan Shifts The Burden To Family Caregivers
Social Security Disability

How The GOP’s Health Plan Shifts The Burden To Family Caregivers

Many aspects of the Obamacare repeal uniquely target older Americans.
In order to qualify for Medicaid, the patient must spend down his or her assets to just this side of zero, and then contribute whatever income they have, like Social Security, to the nursing home for payment.
Medicaid is the primary support for 65 percent of nursing home residents, most of whom enter as private pay patients until they run out of money.
Everyone who was eligible and qualified for Medicaid ― senior, adult or kid ― was guaranteed by the federal government to get it.
It doesn’t take a crystal ball to predict where this would lead: More older people who can’t afford assisted living or nursing homes would turn to their families for help.
Well, consider this: Most caregivers today are walking on thin ice without so much as legal protection from getting fired if they miss too much work.
The unpaid services provided by America’s family caregivers were valued at $500 billion in 2014, according to a Rand report.
The federal Family and Medical Leave Act doesn’t cover 40 percent of the nation’s workforce.
Meanwhile, family caregivers tend to ignore their own health because they are too busy caring for a loved one.
Last year, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine took a sobering look at the state of family caregiving in the U.S., and found that caregivers of elderly family members devoted 253 hours a month to the task — almost the equivalent of two full-time jobs.