Tag: Food

Mom’s 911 call for food for her children prompts officers to help
Welfare

Mom’s 911 call for food for her children prompts officers to help

She was calling 911 because she had no food for her four children.
If I could get some type of assistance,” the young mother said in the Jan. 22 call.
She dispatched Camden County Police Officer David Hinton, with instructions to check on the family.
Bagby told Hinton she wanted to get pizzas delivered to the apartment, but Hinton instead suggested going to McDonald’s, where he bought Happy Meals and other food to hold the kids over until officers could do more.
She told Hinton she had to do more.
Tracy Seigel — “and told her about the call, and said I was going out there by myself after work.”
Tondaleya Bagby, using her own money and what the officers gave her, went to an Aldi and a ShopRite, then she and Seigel went to the apartment.
In addition to getting food for the family, the department also provided her with a navigator to assist with social services.
She is proud of Bagby, her own daughter, and the “warm, giving heart” she showed in helping a young mother in need. “She always says kids are her kryptonite.”

Trump proposes replacing food stamps with food boxes but anti-hunger advocates not swallowing it
Welfare

Trump proposes replacing food stamps with food boxes but anti-hunger advocates not swallowing it

For a time, Dave Miner, who works to end hunger, tried the Blue Apron service at home.
While he liked the recipes, the home-delivered food in a box service was too expensive, so he canceled it.
Under the program, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program recipients who receive more than $90 a month would get less discretionary money and instead would receive a box of nonperishable food items each month.
… The best way for people to get the food they want is to purchase it for themselves.” In Indiana the Family and Social Services Administration oversees the SNAP program.
Under the Trump administration’s proposal, the food boxes will not contain healthy foods such as fresh fruits and vegetables.
Giving SNAP beneficiaries choice over what they purchase helps alleviate some of the stigma attached to receiving government assistance, said Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry.
In addition, the Trump Administration has provided few details for how the plan would work on the ground.
The organization estimates 1 million Hoosiers are food-insecure.
Federal funding could go further if it supported Feeding America regional produce cooperatives, which distribute fresh produce to hundreds of locations across Gleaners’ service area at an average cost of 16.5 cents per pound, Elliott said.
Nor is it clear that there are many places where SNAP can trim costs, said Miner, projects chair for the Indy Hunger Network.

Oh, SNAP! Trump wants to replace food stamps with food boxes
Welfare

Oh, SNAP! Trump wants to replace food stamps with food boxes

Get big government off our backs … and into our stomachs.
That’s the sentiment behind President Donald Trump’s proposal to slash food stamp funding and partially replace the program with deliveries of food boxes to the homes of struggling Americans.
Critics of the plan have likened it to a low-rent Blue Apron, the high-end meal delivery service, but run by big government.
Trump’s massive tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations blew a hole in the budget, so in his budget unveiled earlier this week, he proposes to make up the difference by slashing programs such as food stamps, Medicare and Medicaid that benefit struggling Americans.
The hypocrisy behind the plan is so rank you need to wear a nose clip: Small government conservatives letting big government determine what people eat?
In Michigan, the average Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (food stamp) recipient gets about $122 a month.
Small potatoes considering that Trump’s proposing a $4.4 trillion budget for the upcoming fiscal year.
We’ve got bigger whales to fry.
America, we’re better than this.
More from Mike Thompson:

White House wants to deliver food to the poor, Blue Apron-style
Welfare

White House wants to deliver food to the poor, Blue Apron-style

Think of it as Blue Apron for food stamp recipients. “USDA America’s Harvest Box is a bold, innovative approach to providing nutritious food to people who need assistance feeding themselves and their families — and all of it is homegrown by American farmers and producers,” said Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue in a statement. “It maintains the same level of food value as SNAP [Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program] participants currently receive, provides states flexibility in administering the program, and is responsible to the taxpayers.”
Part of the president’s fiscal 2019 budget blueprint, the idea immediately sparked concerns and questions among consumer advocates and food retailers.
They feared it would upend a much-needed benefit for more than 80% of those in the program.
Here’s how it would work: Instead of receiving all their food stamp funds, households would get a box of food that the government describes as nutritious and 100% grown and produced in the U.S.
The box would be valued at about half of the SNAP recipient’s monthly benefit.
The administration didn’t detail exactly how families would receive the food boxes, saying states could distribute them through existing infrastructure, partnerships or directly to residences through delivery services.
The proposal would save nearly $130 billion over 10 years, as well as improve the nutritional value of the program and reduce the potential for fraud, according to the administration.
Plus, it could be difficult for families to pick up the box, especially if they don’t have a car.

Food’s here: Mom’s 911 call prompts Camden County officers’ help
Welfare

Food’s here: Mom’s 911 call prompts Camden County officers’ help

She was calling 911 because she had no food for her four children.
If I could get some type of assistance,” the young mother said in the Jan. 22 call. “I went inside and found a single mom and four kids in a one-bedroom apartment,” Hinton recalled.
I think she didn’t know what else to do, but I’m glad she called the police.”
Bagby told Hinton she wanted to get pizzas delivered to the apartment, but Hinton instead suggested going to McDonald’s, where he bought Happy Meals and other food to hold the kids over until officers could do more.
She told Hinton she had to do more.
Tracy Seigel — “and told her about the call, and said I was going out there by myself after work.”
Tondaleya Bagby, using her own money and what the officers gave her, went to an Aldi and a ShopRite, then she and Seigel went to the apartment.
She is proud of Bagby, her own daughter, and the “warm, giving heart” she showed in helping a young mother in need. “She always says kids are her kryptonite.”

Mom’s 911 call for food for her children prompts officers to help
Welfare

Mom’s 911 call for food for her children prompts officers to help

She was calling 911 because she had no food for her four children.
If I could get some type of assistance,” the young mother said in the Jan. 22 call.
She dispatched Camden County Police Officer David Hinton, with instructions to check on the family.
Bagby told Hinton she wanted to get pizzas delivered to the apartment, but Hinton instead suggested going to McDonald’s, where he bought Happy Meals and other food to hold the kids over until officers could do more.
She told Hinton she had to do more.
Tracy Seigel — “and told her about the call, and said I was going out there by myself after work.”
Tondaleya Bagby, using her own money and what the officers gave her, went to an Aldi and a ShopRite, then she and Seigel went to the apartment.
In addition to getting food for the family, the department also provided her with a navigator to assist with social services.
She is proud of Bagby, her own daughter, and the “warm, giving heart” she showed in helping a young mother in need. “She always says kids are her kryptonite.”

Trump right to plug junk-food pipeline to poor: Opinion
Welfare

Trump right to plug junk-food pipeline to poor: Opinion

Perhaps the most controversial element of the Trump administration’s budget is the proposal to reduce food stamp spending by 25% or $193 billion over the next decade.
Forty-four million people currently receive food stamps, more than twice as many as at the end of the Clinton administration.
The administration proposes phasing in work requirements for able-bodied adults without dependents.
A 2017 study published in BMC Public Health found that food stamp recipients were twice as likely to be obese as eligible non-recipients.
A 2016 USDA report revealed that soft drinks and other sweetened beverages are the most common purchase in food stamp households, accounting for almost 10% of monthly expenditures.
(The USDA and the Obama administration helped block a 2013 congressional proposal to disclose how recipients actually spend food stamps.)
Food stamp recipients consume twice as many of their daily calories from sugar-sweetened beverages as do higher incomes groups (12% vs. 6%), according to a 2015 study in Preventive Medicine.
A 2015 study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine also found that adult food stamp recipients had less healthy diets than eligible non-recipients.
The Trump reform proposal ignores the easiest way to save more than $100 billion: prohibit using food stamps for junk food. “Seven times as many [low-income] children are obese as are underweight,” the Journal of the American Medical Association noted in 2012.Young children in low-income families are more than 50% more likely to be obese than those in other families, according to a 2016 report.

Donald Trump’s budget slashes government-supplied junk food
Welfare

Donald Trump’s budget slashes government-supplied junk food

Perhaps the most controversial element of the Trump administration’s budget is the proposal to reduce food stamp spending by 25% or $193 billion over the next decade.
Forty-four million people currently receive food stamps, more than twice as many as at the end of the Clinton administration.
The administration proposes phasing in work requirements for able-bodied adults without dependents.
A 2017 study published in BMC Public Health found that food stamp recipients were twice as likely to be obese as eligible non-recipients.
This confirms a 2015 USDA report which revealed that food stamp recipients are far more likely to be obese than eligible non-recipients (40% vs. 32%).
A 2016 USDA report revealed that soft drinks and other sweetened beverages are the most common purchase in food stamp households, accounting for almost 10% of monthly expenditures.
(The USDA and the Obama administration helped block a 2013 congressional proposal to disclose how recipients actually spend food stamps.)
A 2015 study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine also found that adult food stamp recipients had less healthy diets than eligible non-recipients.
The Trump reform proposal ignores the easiest way to save more than $100 billion: prohibit using food stamps for junk food. “Seven times as many [low-income] children are obese as are underweight,” the Journal of the American Medical Association noted in 2012.Young children in low-income families are more than 50% more likely to be obese than those in other families, according to a 2016 report.

Congress debates: Should tax dollars be used to buy junk food?
Welfare

Congress debates: Should tax dollars be used to buy junk food?

Congress debates: Should tax dollars be used to buy junk food?.
WASHINGTON — The House Agriculture Committee debated Thursday whether taxpayers should pay for sweetened beverages through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, but when the five expert witnesses were asked if soda has nutritional value, not one said yes.
Still, only one of the witnesses, Angela Rachidi, who studies poverty for the American Enterprise Institute, a business-oriented think tank, advocated restrictions for candy and soda now paid for by the program.
She said restrictions would prompt retailers to make healthier alternatives available.
Others argued that the cost of implementing restrictions would be prohibitive and have limited value.
“Cashiers end up being food police at check-out time,” said Leslie G. Sarasin, CEO of the Food Marketing Institute, a retail grocery industry association.
“It would create real havoc,” she said.
Although non-SNAP households display similar purchasing habits, Conaway said, “one can reasonably infer that billions in taxpayer dollars are being spent on sweetened beverages and prepared desserts.” Questions ranged from the impact of sweetened beverages on obesity and other health compromises, to the benefit of SNAP nutrition education programs in places where the only grocery provider is a convenience store.
Some advocated increasing the monthly benefit while one asked if it should be block-granted to the states.
He said schools in his district are experimenting with salad bars, encouraging children to bring home healthy habits to their families.

Venezuelans are losing weight amid food shortages, skyrocketing prices
Welfare

Venezuelans are losing weight amid food shortages, skyrocketing prices

Venezuelans are losing weight amid food shortages, skyrocketing prices.
The monthly food bag, worth 10,000 bolivares ($2.25), includes rice, milk, pasta, beans and a few other items.
Venezuela’s socialist government, led by President Nicolas Maduro, raised the minimum wage 60% on Sunday to 200,021 bolivares ($45) a month, including food stamps.
In March, a basket of basic grocery items — including eggs, milk and fruit — cost 772,614 bolivares, or close to four times the monthly minimum wage, according to the Venezuela-based Center of Social Analysis and Documentation, or CENDAS in the Spanish acronym.
A carton of 30 eggs cost 9,600 bolivares in March, up from 1,180 bolivares in March 2015, CENDAS reports. “Food prices have gone sky high and the minimum wage is not enough for basic needs,” says Eugenia Morin, 59, who describes herself as a middle-class housewife.
Prices for basics are skyrocketing each month.
Venezuelans either face food and toiletry shortages at supermarkets with empty shelves — or skyrocketing prices for whatever items are available.
But even when oil prices were high, that policy was barely sustainable — food shortages starting popping up when oil was worth over $100 a barrel.
But with oil now hovering around $50 a barrel, Maduro’s administration can’t afford to import enough food and also pay down its debts to foreign creditors.