Tag: Man

Republicans’ new welfare reform focus: Low-income men
Unemployment

Republicans’ new welfare reform focus: Low-income men

A generation ago, Republicans focused on reforming the nation’s safety net by requiring poor mothers to work.
These days, the Trump administration and Republican leaders are once again looking to overhaul government assistance programs.
Much of the focus this time centers on requiring able-bodied, working age recipientsto get jobs or participate in other community activities if they want to receive Medicaid or food stamps — two of the largest public aid programs in the US with tens of millions of enrollees each. “Their incomes will go up and they’ll be less likely to be poor.”
Arkansas, meanwhile, is exempting those who live with dependent children or care for someone who is incapacitated — roles that often fall to women.
The Trump administration and Republican leaders are positioning work requirements as an opportunity to improve Medicaid recipients’ health and financial independence, but consumer advocates say such measures will leave many more Americans uninsured.
The food stamp program has also seen a surge in participation in recent years, particularly among men.
The number of non-elderly men receiving SNAP benefits stood at 7.2 million in fiscal 2016, up 84% from fiscal 2008, according to federal data.
Just under 70% of men are in the labor force — either in a job or looking for one — compared to nearly 87% in 1948, when the federal government began measuring the statistic.
That number has been changed to include only men between the ages of 18 and 59 who received food stamps.

Hobe Sound man indicted on federal fraud charges
Social Security Disability

Hobe Sound man indicted on federal fraud charges

People can call Treasure Coast Crime Stoppers to leave anonymous tips.
Wochit FORT PIERCE — A federal grand jury indicted a Hobe Sound man on charges including tax evasion, mail fraud and theft of government funds in connection with fraudulent disability payments, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.
The indictment against Arthur John Kranz, a doctor who specialized in psychiatry, was unsealed Thursday.
The application was approved.
Kranz was supposed to notify the Social Security Administration if he went back to work.
A Justice Department news release states Kranz worked as a psychiatrist in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2013, earning more than $1.6 million that wasn’t reported to the Social Security Administration or the insurance company.
More: ‘Gamblers’ charged with fraud in connection with thefts from several arcades in Indian River County Kranz also is accused of trying to conceal his income from the Social Security Administration and the Internal Revenue Service.
Kranz is accused of getting more than $700,000 in fraudulent disability payments from the Social Security Administration and the insurance company.
In all, Kranz faces charges of tax evasion, mail fraud, wire fraud, theft of government funds and Social Security disability fraud.
More: Fort Pierce man one of hundreds charged in largest-ever elder fraud sweep by Justice Department

This man spent more years behind bars than any other wrongfully imprisoned person in America
Welfare

This man spent more years behind bars than any other wrongfully imprisoned person in America

It’s just one of many revelations Phillips is dealing with these days after 45 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit.
The brother-in-law told investigators he’d met up with Phillips and another man, Richard Polombo, at a bar to discuss Harris’ murder.
Phillips and Polombo were convicted.
And in October 1972, Phillips was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. “When he first got his new trial, prosecutors dangled a carrot,” Phillip’s attorney Gabi Silver told CNN.
Silver, Phillip’s attorney, told CNN that she was “hopeful and very confident” that he would receive full compensation. “Exonerees do not get very much compensation from the State of Michigan.”
Phillips says he has been living off $80 worth of food stamps each month since December.
He’s living in an apartment with a friend. “I’m so happy to be free, I’ll make any adjustment I have to make,” Phillips said.

Republicans’ new welfare reform focus: Low-income men
Welfare

Republicans’ new welfare reform focus: Low-income men

A generation ago, Republicans focused on reforming the nation’s safety net by requiring poor mothers to work.
These days, the Trump administration and Republican leaders are once again looking to overhaul government assistance programs.
Much of the focus this time centers on requiring able-bodied, working age recipients to get jobs or participate in other community activities if they want to receive Medicaid or food stamps — two of the largest public aid programs in the US with tens of millions of enrollees each. “Their incomes will go up and they’ll be less likely to be poor.”
Arkansas, meanwhile, is exempting those who live with dependent children or care for someone who is incapacitated — roles that often fall to women.
The Trump administration and Republican leaders are positioning work requirements as an opportunity to improve Medicaid recipients’ health and financial independence, but consumer advocates say such measures will leave many more Americans uninsured.
The food stamp program has also seen a surge in participation in recent years, particularly among men.
The number of men receiving SNAP benefits jumped to 18.9 million in fiscal 2016, up 65% from fiscal 2008, according to federal data.
The Agriculture Department is currently seeking comments on how to get more able-bodied, working age adults without dependent children — 54% of whom are men — into the labor force.
Just under 70% of men are in the labor force — either in a job or looking for one — compared to nearly 87% in 1948, when the federal government began measuring the statistic.

Va. man jailed after failing drug tests while on probation
Social Security Disability

Va. man jailed after failing drug tests while on probation

Rodney Nock, 31, of Accomac, told the court he received Social Security Disability Insurance because of mental issues.
Kiana Fitchett told the court her brother had lived with her in the past, “but he didn’t pay rent so I told him to go.
He has an attitude,” she told the judge.
But Fitchett said she was again willing to take him into her Virginia Beach home.
“He has tested positive in every drug screen for the last eight months.” More: Fight with officer ends with jail time for Va. man Wolfe told the court Nock owed $5,000 in restitution and “has not made one payment.” She asked that his probation be revoked and that he receive some of the 18 years of suspended time hanging over his head.
“He has blatantly violated the terms of his probation,” Wolfe said.
By your actions, you have given me the right to take 18 years of your life and put you in the penitentiary.” He told Nock he had a list of things for him to do and warned that, if they are not done, Nock will be incarcerated.
Lilly said when he is released, Nock will live at his sister’s Virginia Beach address, pay rent and make restitution payments.
You will obey the instructions of your probation officer, no drugs or alcohol.”
Lilly asked his sister to look into the matter of his lost Medicaid card and drive him to his appointments.

The Big Lie: ‘Man of the people’
Welfare

The Big Lie: ‘Man of the people’

Voters who thought President Trump would try to fulfill his populist, America-first campaign promises were cynically and cruelly deceived.
Trump placates these supporters with rhetoric, distracts them with cultural warfare and encourages them to seek refuge in cultural chauvinism.
Well, he claims to be doing even more — $1.5 trillion in infrastructure spending over the next decade.
But mayors and governors don’t have $1.3 trillion just lying around.
Many voters perhaps did not realize the Trump Organization’s business model had little to do with actual construction and everything to do with branding.
The president’s good at that.
The tax bill Trump signed delivers the lion’s share of benefits to corporations and the rich.
Trump anticipates ballooning the national debt by $7 trillion over the next decade.
His budget cuts $554 billion in Medicare spending over 10 years and $250 billion in Medicaid spending.
But this is the Big Lie that must be constantly exposed between now and the November election: Trump is worsening the society’s bias in favor of the wealthy — and laughing at the chumps who put him in office.

Michigan man’s dog approved for $360 unemployment check
Unemployment

Michigan man’s dog approved for $360 unemployment check

Michael Haddock, an attorney in Saugatuck, Mich., was surprised when he got a letter in the mail addressed to a Michael Ryder qualifying Ryder for unemployment benefits.
The problem?
The UIA said its computer system did send out the initial letter to Haddock’s address, according to WZZM.
The agency has since sent another letter to Haddock’s address denying the claim. “It’s important to note that no money was paid out,” DeWitt said. “Criminals get a hold of people’s personal information like name, address and Social Security numbers and file a false claim.
Those criminals are using that information to file claims.” “ID theft is a growing crime in all sectors, including unemployment fraud,” Stokes said.
The TIA issued steps individuals can take to protect themselves: Guard your Social Security number.
Review your credit card report at least once a year to be certain that it doesn’t include accounts that you have not opened.