Tag: Republican Party (United States)

States aren’t waiting for Washington to require poor residents to work
Welfare

States aren’t waiting for Washington to require poor residents to work

Otherwise, they can only receive benefits for up to three months every three years.
But states can request waivers of the work requirement for areas where unemployment is at least 10% or there is an insufficient number of jobs, as defined by the Department of Labor.
Instead, they say these food stamp recipients should start moving toward independence by getting jobs or enrolling in training programs.
By the end of May, recipients in 112 counties will be subject to the three-month time limit on benefits if they don’t work, up from 20 counties at the end of last year.
Lifting these waivers will impact most of the 87,000 Kentucky adults in the program who don’t have dependents, according to the left-leaning Kentucky Center for Economic Policy.
In West Virginia, state officials will start phasing out the number of counties with work requirement waivers later this year.
But in October 2022, West Virginia will no longer be able to apply for a waiver for any county, no matter the economic circumstances, according to a bill passed by the state legislature and signed by Governor Jim Justice last month.
The bills aim to apply the work requirement to parents of school-age children, to increase the number of hours food stamp recipients must work and to explore developing employment plans for those living in public housing.
Many of the proposals will require either federal approval or a change in federal law.
Three states — Kentucky, Indiana and Arkansas — have already received federal approval to do so.

States aren’t waiting for Washington to require poor residents to work
Unemployment

States aren’t waiting for Washington to require poor residents to work

Otherwise, they can only receive benefits for up to three months every three years.
But states can request waivers of the work requirement for areas where unemployment is at least 10% or there is an insufficient number of jobs, as defined by the Department of Labor.
Instead, they say these food stamp recipients should start moving toward independence by getting jobs or enrolling in training programs.
By the end of May, recipients in 112 counties will be subject to the three-month time limit on benefits if they don’t work, up from 20 counties at the end of last year.
Lifting these waivers will impact most of the 87,000 Kentucky adults in the program who don’t have dependents, according to the left-leaning Kentucky Center for Economic Policy.
In West Virginia, state officials will start phasing out the number of counties with work requirement waivers later this year.
But in October 2022, West Virginia will no longer be able to apply for a waiver for any county, no matter the economic circumstances, according to a bill passed by the state legislature and signed by Governor Jim Justice last month.
The bills aim to apply the work requirement to parents of school-age children, to increase the number of hours food stamp recipients must work and to explore developing employment plans for those living in public housing.
Many of the proposals will require either federal approval or a change in federal law.
Three states — Kentucky, Indiana and Arkansas — have already received federal approval to do so.

AP FACT CHECK: No, tax-filing migraines are not going away
Unemployment

AP FACT CHECK: No, tax-filing migraines are not going away

Trump himself, in USA Today, declared: “This is the last year Americans will fill out outdated, complicated tax forms.”
But everything old is new again, or will be, for many people when they sit down to do their taxes next year.
A look at some statements on the matter and the reality behind them: PENCE, in tweets Tuesday: “Thanks to the historic TRUMP TAX CUTS, today marks the last time the American people will file taxes under a complicated & outdated tax system.
And: “Next year will be simple.”
Yes, for the last time.
There’s already a one-page form, the 1040EZ, which has been around for years.
Trump previously had promised a card-size tax form but now appears to be backing off that claim by describing next year’s form as “for the most part one page” but “may get a little bit bigger.”
In fact, there’s no sign that the IRS is planning new filing forms, card-size or otherwise, for the 2018 tax year.
As for Pence’s claim that the tax cuts are the biggest in history, no.
Trump wrote, more modestly: “I signed one of the largest tax cuts in history and the most sweeping tax reform in a generation.”

Food stamp recipients would have to work under proposed farm bill
Welfare

Food stamp recipients would have to work under proposed farm bill

Video by Jennifer Sangalang, FLORIDA TODAY Wochit WASHINGTON — Republicans controlling the House are proposing sweeping new work mandates on the nation’s more than 40 million food stamp recipients as they kick off debate on an election-year overhaul of the government’s food and farm programs.
(Photo: Robert F. Bukaty, AP) The legislation has traditionally been bipartisan, blending support from urban Democrats supporting nutrition programs with farm state lawmakers supporting crop insurance, farm credit, and land conservation. “We believe breaking this poverty cycle is very important,” Conaway said.
The latest proposal on food stamps, officially called the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, would require states to impose stricter uniform work requirements for SNAP recipients between 18 and 59.
Stricter rules apply to able-bodied adults without dependents between the ages of 18 and 49, who are subject to a three-month limit of benefits unless they meet a work requirement of 80 hours per month.
Under the new bill, that requirement would be expanded to apply to all work-capable adults, mandating that they either work or participate in work training for 20 hours per week with the exception of seniors, pregnant women, caretakers of children under the age of six, or people with disabilities.
The new work requirements would take effect in 2021, and increase to 25 hours per week in 2026.
Each new SNAP recipient would have one month to comply with the rule.
House Agriculture Committee Ranking Member Collin Peterson, D-Minnesota, criticized the bill for “breaking up the long-standing, bipartisan, urban-rural farm bill alliance,” calling it “a dangerous and unproductive step that will only sow division and jeopardize both this and future farm bills.”
The farm bill can give them that.

Both parties have a plan for the debt crisis: Do nothing
Unemployment

Both parties have a plan for the debt crisis: Do nothing

Here are the CBO projections.
Since 1950, deficits have equaled or exceeded 5 percent of GDP in only six years (1983, 1985 and 2009-2012), and most of these occurred after deep recessions.
Adding these amounts to government borrowing would increase the federal debt — the total of all past deficits — to more than 100 percent of GDP, about as large as right after World War II.
They warned of an approaching “debt crisis” if ballooning budget deficits weren’t reversed.
On April 9, five Democratic economists issued a rejoinder in The Post, rejecting the Hoover economists’ suggestion that spending cuts for “entitlements” — mainly programs for the elderly and the poor — bear all the burden of cuts.
In today’s dollars, balancing the budget would require annual spending cuts and tax increases of about $1 trillion.
That’s equal to about a fifth of federal spending, which is now being borrowed.
Social Security and other “safety net” programs would have to be reduced, possibly through higher eligibility ages and more means-testing.
These entitlements constitute about 70 percent of federal spending; if they’re ignored, the entire adjustment would fall on other spending (other domestic programs and defense) and taxes.
But a debt crisis does not come slowly and visibly like a rising tide.

House GOP bill would lock the poor out of food stamps if they don’t work
Unemployment

House GOP bill would lock the poor out of food stamps if they don’t work

Many food stamp recipients could be locked out of the program for up to three years if they fail to work or enroll in job training, under a bill proposed by House Republicans seeking to overhaul the government benefit. “Benefits are critically important and serve a vital role in the safety net aimed at catching people if they should fall into poverty,” House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway co-wrote in an op-ed published Thursday in USA Today. “But equally important is a focus on helping these same people climb back out of poverty.”
President Donald Trump signed an executive order Tuesday directing federal agencies to promote employment for those on public assistance.
Earlier this year, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services began allowing states to mandate that certain Medicaid enrollees must work for the first time in the program’s history, while the Department of Housing and Urban Development is looking into the issue for those in subsidized housing.
The Department of Agriculture also wants to strengthen the work requirements in the food stamp program, officially known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.
The House farm bill calls for expanding the number of people subject to work requirements.
About 3.5 million of the roughly 41 million people enrolled in SNAP are subject to this provision.
It would also mandate recipients to work or participate in a training program for a minimum of 25 hours a week starting in fiscal 2026.
In households that receive SNAP and have at least one non-disabled adult, 58% are employed and 82% worked in the year prior to or after enrollment, according to the left-leaning Center for American Progress.

Republicans’ new welfare reform focus: Low-income men
Unemployment

Republicans’ new welfare reform focus: Low-income men

A generation ago, Republicans focused on reforming the nation’s safety net by requiring poor mothers to work.
These days, the Trump administration and Republican leaders are once again looking to overhaul government assistance programs.
Much of the focus this time centers on requiring able-bodied, working age recipientsto get jobs or participate in other community activities if they want to receive Medicaid or food stamps — two of the largest public aid programs in the US with tens of millions of enrollees each. “Their incomes will go up and they’ll be less likely to be poor.”
Arkansas, meanwhile, is exempting those who live with dependent children or care for someone who is incapacitated — roles that often fall to women.
The Trump administration and Republican leaders are positioning work requirements as an opportunity to improve Medicaid recipients’ health and financial independence, but consumer advocates say such measures will leave many more Americans uninsured.
The food stamp program has also seen a surge in participation in recent years, particularly among men.
The number of non-elderly men receiving SNAP benefits stood at 7.2 million in fiscal 2016, up 84% from fiscal 2008, according to federal data.
Just under 70% of men are in the labor force — either in a job or looking for one — compared to nearly 87% in 1948, when the federal government began measuring the statistic.
That number has been changed to include only men between the ages of 18 and 59 who received food stamps.

House GOP bill would lock the poor out of food stamps if they don’t work
Welfare

House GOP bill would lock the poor out of food stamps if they don’t work

Many food stamp recipients could be locked out of the program for up to three years if they fail to work or enroll in job training, under a bill proposed by House Republicans seeking to overhaul the government benefit. “Benefits are critically important and serve a vital role in the safety net aimed at catching people if they should fall into poverty,” House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway co-wrote in an op-ed published Thursday in USA Today. “But equally important is a focus on helping these same people climb back out of poverty.”
President Donald Trump signed an executive order Tuesday directing federal agencies to promote employment for those on public assistance.
Earlier this year, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services began allowing states to mandate that certain Medicaid enrollees must work for the first time in the program’s history, while the Department of Housing and Urban Development is looking into the issue for those in subsidized housing.
The Department of Agriculture also wants to strengthen the work requirements in the food stamp program, officially known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.
The House farm bill calls for expanding the number of people subject to work requirements.
About 3.5 million of the roughly 41 million people enrolled in SNAP are subject to this provision.
It would also mandate recipients to work or participate in a training program for a minimum of 25 hours a week starting in fiscal 2026.
In households that receive SNAP and have at least one non-disabled adult, 58% are employed and 82% worked in the year prior to or after enrollment, according to the left-leaning Center for American Progress.

Analysis: Tax cuts, spending to raise deficit to $1T by 2020
Unemployment

Analysis: Tax cuts, spending to raise deficit to $1T by 2020

The combined effect of President Donald Trump’s tax cuts and last month’s budget-busting spending bill is sending the federal deficit toward the $1 trillion mark next year, according to a new analysis by the Congressional Budget Office.
Republicans once laced into President Barack Obama for trillion-dollar-plus deficits but mostly fell quiet on Monday’s news.
The administration had promised the cuts would pay for themselves.
Instead, Monday’s report estimates that the GOP tax bill, which is Republican-controlled Washington’s signature accomplishment under Trump, will add $1.8 trillion to the deficit over the coming decade, even after its positive effects on the economy are factored in.
The economic growth promises to drop the nationwide unemployment rate below 4 percent starting this year, CBO predicts, though interest rates would rise more rapidly than the agency had earlier predicted, countering some of the positive economic impact of the tax cuts.
The report paints an unrelentingly bleak picture of the federal deficit, predicting it will hit $804 billion this year, rise to just under $1 trillion for the upcoming budget year and permanently breach the $1 trillion mark in 2020 unless Congress stems the burst of red ink.
With conservatives complaining about the $1.3 trillion catchall spending bill — which blew through previous budget limits by $300 billion over this year and next — House GOP leaders have scheduled a vote this week on a proposed amendment to the Constitution to require a balanced federal budget.
Many economists believe that if deficits continue to rise and the national debt grows, government borrowing will “crowd out” private lending and force up interest rates.
And if interest rates go up, the government will have to pay much more to finance the more than $14 trillion in Treasury debt held by investors.
It warns that interest rates on government borrowing will spike, with the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, currently yielding 2.8 percent, will average a 3.0 percent interest rate this year and 3.7 percent next year.

The US government’s budget deficit is about to explode — and the Trump tax law and spending surge is to blame
Unemployment

The US government’s budget deficit is about to explode — and the Trump tax law and spending surge is to blame

The CBO also reports that economic growth will lower the unemployment rate below 4 percent.
WASHINGTON (AP) — The combined effects of President Trump’s tax cuts and last month’s budget-busting spending bill is sending the government’s budget deficit toward the $1 trillion mark next year, according to a new analysis by the Congressional Budget Office.
The CBO report says that that the twin tax and spending bills will push the budget deficit to $804 billion this year and just under $1 trillion for the upcoming budget year.
The administration had promised the cuts would pay for themselves.
The economic growth promises to drop the nationwide unemployment rate below 4 percent, CBO predicts.
The report paints an unrelentingly bleak picture of federal deficits, which would permanently breach the $1 trillion mark in 2020 unless Congress stems the burst of red ink.
Deficits would grow to $1.5 trillion by 2028 — and could exceed $2 trillion if the tax cuts are fully extended and if Washington doesn’t cut spending.
Republicans controlling Washington have largely lost interest in taking on the deficit, and the issue has fallen in prominence in recent years.
Now that conservatives complained about the $1.3 trillion catchall spending bill — which blew through previous budget limits by $300 billion over this year and next, House GOP leaders have scheduled a vote this week on a proposed amendment to the Constitution to require a balanced federal budget.
Many economists believe that if deficits continue to rise and the national debt grows, government borrowing will “crowd out” private lending and force up interest rates.