Tag: Requirement

Increased work requirements for food stamps affecting several Georgia residents
Welfare

Increased work requirements for food stamps affecting several Georgia residents

Sitting on sofa in her apartment, reading to her 1-year-old daughter, Celine Schmall says it wasn’t long ago that she didn’t know how she could afford to feed her little girl.
The young mother was working, but still needed food stamps.
“People always say [to people on food stamps], ‘oh you’re lazy or you could be working more hours.’” Schmall told CB46.
“Well, the truth is, I’m paying the majority out of pocket just to be able to afford for her to go to daycare, so that I can go to work and make money.
She is currently in school, and says she still worries about the future of the program for others like her.
The Division of Family and Children’s Services, which issues food stamps, doesn’t know how the executive order will impact the Georgia program.
The program requires able bodied adults without dependents to work 80 hours a month or to be in a workfare program in order to qualify.
“The majority of the people who are getting food stamps are not in that category of able -bodied adults without dependents,” Jones said.
“The majority of those people receiving benefits are single parents with young children, medical condition, or advanced age.” Jones indicated that Georgia could be ahead of other states in implementing more work requirements because it has the SNAP Works program, which, in partnership with Goodwill, helps recipients with job training and positions.
The state says this was a proactive approach made years ago to promote employment for those in need of assistance.

Trump signs executive order pushing work requirements for the poor
Welfare

Trump signs executive order pushing work requirements for the poor

President Donald Trump is now setting his sights on overhauling the nation’s safety net programs.
Also, the executive order asked agencies to consider adding work requirements to government aid programs that lack them. “The federal government should do everything within its authority to empower individuals by providing opportunities for work, including by investing in federal programs that are effective at moving people into the workforce and out of poverty,” the order read.
The Department of Agriculture also wants to strengthen the work requirements in the food stamp program.
Several states, particularly those with Republican leaders, have also been adding work mandates.
More than 74 million Americans are on Medicaid, while more than 41 million people receive food stamps, formally known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.
Getting people to work — even if they still need some assistance — is the first step to helping them gain economic independence, he said.
In households that receive SNAP and have at least one non-disabled adult, 58% are employed and 82% worked in the year prior to or after enrollment, according to the Center for American Progress.
Among Medicaid recipients, 60% of able-bodied, working-age adults have jobs, while nearly 80% live in families with at least one member in the labor force, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis.
Instead of mandating employment, the president could do other things to help Americans gain economic independence, Vallas said.

Trump signs executive order pushing work requirements for the poor
Unemployment

Trump signs executive order pushing work requirements for the poor

President Donald Trump is now setting his sights on overhauling the nation’s safety net programs.
Also, the executive order asked agencies to consider adding work requirements to government aid programs that lack them. “The federal government should do everything within its authority to empower individuals by providing opportunities for work, including by investing in federal programs that are effective at moving people into the workforce and out of poverty,” the order read.
The Department of Agriculture also wants to strengthen the work requirements in the food stamp program.
Several states, particularly those with Republican leaders, have also been adding work mandates.
More than 74 million Americans are on Medicaid, while more than 41 million people receive food stamps, formally known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.
Getting people to work — even if they still need some assistance — is the first step to helping them gain economic independence, he said.
In households that receive SNAP and have at least one non-disabled adult, 58% are employed and 82% worked in the year prior to or after enrollment, according to the Center for American Progress.
Among Medicaid recipients, 60% of able-bodied, working-age adults have jobs, while nearly 80% live in families with at least one member in the labor force, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis.
Instead of mandating employment, the president could do other things to help Americans gain economic independence, Vallas said.

Medicaid work requirements will reduce care for mentally ill
Social Security Disability

Medicaid work requirements will reduce care for mentally ill

The Department of Health and Human Services recently issued new guidelines encouraging states to implement work requirements in their Medicaid programs.
One important group to consider in evaluating the effects of work requirements is adults with mental and addictive illnesses.
Some in this group will not be required to work, because they qualify for Medicaid because of a work disability under the Social Security criteria and are automatically exempt from work requirements.
However, only about half of Medicaid-eligible adults who have a mental illness and do not work are classified as disabled according to these criteria.
Unfortunately, the nature of mental and addictive illnesses suggests that this exemption process will be challenging to implement, both for states and for beneficiaries.
They were just half as likely to work following the determination as similar women who did not apply for SSI.
The second problem with implementing the medical frailty requirement in the case of mental illness has to do with the effects of these conditions on beneficiaries themselves.
The burden of proving medical frailty in the Kentucky waiver program will generally fall on the recipient.
Decades of policy and practice have been invested in encouraging people with mental health and addictive conditions to seek out and maintain care — even to compel people to get care — because the conditions themselves interfere with decision-making and the care-seeking process.
For people with mental illnesses, work requirements just won’t work.

On Medicaid work requirements, who will judge the character judges?
Welfare

On Medicaid work requirements, who will judge the character judges?

People with Medicaid coverage are far from the only beneficiaries of government generosity.
… Now I am able to work more.” And “I am finally getting everything that was wrong with me fixed so that I can go back to work.” They are all quoted in a 2014 study by the Ohio Department of Medicaid, and their comments are on my mind as the Trump administration encourages states to impose work requirements on people who use Medicaid.
More: If Democrats were in charge, I’d let people buy Medicaid coverage: Senator The administration and conservatives in general are very interested in making certain people (those without much money) prove they are worthy of receiving certain federal benefits (such as food stamps and Medicaid).
The Heritage Foundation articulated it this way: Americans who receive these kinds of government benefits should “engage in responsible and constructive behavior as a condition of receiving aid.” That is, they should work or be looking for work, and they should be drug-free.
He accepted $3.6 billion in federal farm subsidies from 1999 to 2016 (“other people’s money”).
Where are the drug tests for farmers, the good-citizen tests for corporations, the work requirements for rich beneficiaries of tax breaks and loopholes that drain massive amounts from the U.S. Treasury?
No doubt there are malingerers and cheaters on Medicaid, just like there are people and companies that “game the system” to get tax breaks, subsidies or government contracts.
Proof you’re working.
Proof you can’t work.
Proof you are a worthy person.

What Medicaid’s Work Requirement Means For Seniors, People With Disabilities, And Their Caregivers
Social Security Disability

What Medicaid’s Work Requirement Means For Seniors, People With Disabilities, And Their Caregivers

The Trump Administration announced last week that it will allow states to require Medicaid recipients to work, take job training, or do community service to stay eligible for the program, which provides both medical and long-term care services for people with low incomes.
What will the requirement mean for older adults, younger people with disabilities, or their family caregivers?
The Trump Administration would leave their Medicaid eligibility up to the states.
That’s not unusual: One-quarter of family caregivers say they spend 40 hours a week helping relatives.
Children qualify if they are under age 19, students under age 24, or if they are “permanently or totally disabled.” They must also live with their caregiver for at least half the year.
Who is a dependent?
In Kentucky, because her parents may not meet the definition of a dependent, she may be subject to the work requirement.
According to its proposal, “caregiving services for a non-dependent relative or other person with a disabling medical condition” satisfy the 80 hours per month work requirement.
But Kentucky’s caregiving exception may not apply in other states that impose work requirements.
Most who can work, already do.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker pushes welfare overhaul to include work requirement for parents on food stamps
Welfare

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker pushes welfare overhaul to include work requirement for parents on food stamps

The GOP governor is pushing for a series of welfare bills, including requiring able-bodied parents of children on food stamps to work or get training to receive more than three months of benefits and increasing the existing work requirement for all able-bodied adults from 20 hours a week to 30.
This existing requirement — offered by Walker in 2013 — has led so far to about 3.5 recipients losing benefits for every one that secured a job through the program.
“We want to remove barriers to work and make it easier to get a job, while making sure public assistance is available for those who truly need it.”
Walker has referred to Tuesday’s loss in Wisconsin’s 10th Senate District as “wake-up call for Republicans” and this week the governor has pushed aggressively to remind his voters about his records and goals.
Republicans say these proposals would make individuals more self-sufficient and help employers find workers at a time when the state unemployment rate is at 3%.
Taking parents’ food stamps will lower the household’s income and have an inevitable effect on their kids, they said.
The other bills deal in part with the food stamp program known as Food Share, in which federal taxpayers pay for benefits and the state helps pay for administrative costs.
The state’s existing training requirements for childless adults cost the state roughly $18 million in state money over two years and have led to 24,420 able-bodied Food Share participants in the state finding work through the program and 86,000 state residents losing their federally funded benefits.
The state could use the money to pay contractors for reaching big cost savings or improvements in performance.
“Public assistance was never intended to be permanent,” Vos said in a statement.

Trump’s Medicaid Work Requirement Will Backfire
Welfare

Trump’s Medicaid Work Requirement Will Backfire

Image Just because President Trump and the Republican Congress were unable to pass health care legislation that would have unwound the coverage benefits of the Affordable Care Act doesn’t mean such attacks are behind us.
The administration’s new approach — one that no administration before it has taken — is to provide waivers to states that allow them to impose work requirements for Medicaid benefits.
Now the administration will be considering waivers that are likely to deprive thousands of low-income people of health care.
Some of these people will lose coverage because they can’t find jobs to fulfill the work requirements.
They would instead, she said, “let states kick people off coverage if they don’t comply with new requirements that have nothing to do with health insurance.” People losing coverage could suffer severe harm.
A study of Medicaid expansion in Kentucky and Arkansas found that it led to significant gains in access to care, financial security and health, with increases in the share of low-income adults going for checkups, getting regular care for chronic conditions and reporting that they are in excellent health.
Among adults on Medicaid who don’t work and could be subject to the work requirement, more than a third have a chronic health problem or disability, about half take care of their family or go to school, and just under 10 percent can’t find work.
By providing coverage for workers in jobs that are unlikely to provide such benefits, and by helping to stabilize the finances of people with illnesses, Medicaid has been found to help people stay employed or find work.
Medicaid is working, as are most able-bodied adults who are eligible for it.
The administration’s bid to cut the program under the guise of mobility-enhancing work requirements must be seen for what it is.

Trump administration opens the way for a Medicaid work requirement
Welfare

Trump administration opens the way for a Medicaid work requirement

Seema Verma, head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said work and community involvement can make a positive difference in people’s lives and in their health.
It was expanded under President Obama, with an option that has allowed states to cover millions more low-income adults; many have jobs that don’t provide health insurance.
The administration’s latest action spells out safeguards that states should consider to obtain federal approval for waivers imposing work requirements on “able-bodied” adults.
The administration said 10 states — mostly conservative ones — have applied for waivers involving work requirements or community involvement.
Advocates for low-income people say they expect Kentucky’s waiver to be approved shortly.
Advocates for low-income people said work has never been a requirement for Medicaid, a program originally intended as a health program for the poor and disabled.
A study from the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation found that a surprising number of working-age adults on Medicaid are already employed.
Kaiser polling last year found that 70% of the public support allowing states to impose work requirements on Medicaid recipients, even as most people in the U.S. were against deep Medicaid cuts sought by congressional Republicans and the Trump administration.
These include: —exempting pregnant women, disabled people and the elderly.
“Medicaid is a health program that is supposed to serve people who don’t otherwise have coverage.”

Trump Administration Says States May Impose Work Requirements for Medicaid
Welfare

Trump Administration Says States May Impose Work Requirements for Medicaid

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration said Thursday that it would allow states to impose work requirements in Medicaid, a major policy shift in the health program for low-income people.
Federal officials said they would support state efforts to require able-bodied adults to engage in work or other “community engagement activities” as a condition of eligibility for Medicaid.
Ms. Verma said the Trump administration was responding to requests from Medicaid officials in 10 states that wanted to run demonstration projects testing requirements for work or other types of community engagement like training, education, job search, volunteer activities and caregiving.
The proposals, she said, came from Arizona, Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Utah and Wisconsin.
Advocates for Medicaid beneficiaries said the new policy was likely to be challenged in court if people were denied coverage for failure to meet a state’s work requirement.
Federal law gives the secretary of health and human services broad authority to grant waivers for state demonstration projects that promote the goals of the Medicaid program.
In the past, federal officials said that work was not one of the purposes of Medicaid.
But Trump administration officials said Thursday that work requirements were consistent with the goals of Medicaid, because work and other community engagement activities could improve the health of Medicaid beneficiaries.
“Productive work and community engagement may improve health outcomes,” Brian Neale, the director of the federal Medicaid office, said Thursday in a letter to state Medicaid directors.
“For example, higher earnings are positively correlated with longer lifespan.” In addition, Mr. Neale said, researchers have found “strong evidence that unemployment is generally harmful to health,” while employment tends to improve “general mental health.” A 2013 Gallup poll found that unemployed Americans are more than twice as likely as those with full-time jobs to say they have or are being treated for depression, Mr. Neale said.