Tag: Supplemental Security Income

7 Things You Need to Know About Social Security Disability Benefits
Social Security Disability

7 Things You Need to Know About Social Security Disability Benefits

There’s also a Social Security program that pays disability benefits based on your work history, which can provide a valuable inflation-protected income stream if you become unable to work.
With that in mind, here are seven things American workers and their families should know about Social Security disability insurance.
There are two forms of Social Security disability insurance Generally, when you hear someone refer to “Social Security disability,” they’re talking about Social Security Disability Insurance, or SSDI.
The minimum duration of work required varies from 1.5 years for workers who become disabled before age 28 to 9.5 years of work for workers who become disabled at age 60.
Second, you need to be disabled (obviously).
How much would you get if you became disabled?
Just like with retired workers, your average Social Security-taxed earnings are used to determine your disability benefits.
In general, the amount you can expect to receive from Social Security Disability Insurance is slightly less than you could expect to receive had you worked until full retirement age.
You’ll need to create an account at www.SSA.gov if you haven’t done so already, and you can then view your statement, which is packed with valuable information about your Social Security and Medicare benefits, including how much you could expect to get from disability benefits if you were to qualify for them this year.
You may still need disability income insurance Social Security retirement benefits are designed to replace about 40% of the average worker’s income.

Pavlich: The claim Trump let the mentally ill get guns is a lie
Social Security Disability

Pavlich: The claim Trump let the mentally ill get guns is a lie

President Trump simply reversed an Obama-era policy that stripped the Second Amendment rights from Social Security recipients without due process.
Let’s review.
In 2015 and 2016, the Obama administration implemented a series of policies that deemed those needing a representative payee through the Social Security Administration and Veterans Affairs “mentally unfit.” As a result, millions of individuals became ineligible to purchase a firearm.
These so-called mentally unfit individuals were then entered into the National Instant Criminal Background Check System as ineligible to purchase a firearm without due process.
“In December 2016, the SSA promulgated a final rule that would require the names of all Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit recipients — who, because of a mental impairment, use a representative payee to help manage their benefits – be submitted to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS), which is used during gun purchases,” the ACLU wrote in a letter to senators last year.
There is no data to support a connection between the need for a representative payee to manage one’s Social Security disability benefits and a propensity toward gun violence,” the letter continued.
Last year, the House and Senate voted to bar the Social Security Administration from engaging in the practice of entering individuals seeking monetary guidance into the background check system as mentally unfit, reversing the Obama administration policy.
“Once the VA determines that a veteran requires a fiduciary to administer benefit payments, the VA reports that veteran to the gun ban list, consequently denying his or her right to possess and own firearms,” Grassley wrote.
“Veterans are losing their Second Amendment rights because they have someone managing their checkbook,” Grassley wrote in a letter to President Trump earlier this month.
Trump did not reverse a policy that allows the mentally ill to purchase firearms as reporters, media pundits and anti-Second Amendment activists have recklessly claimed.

Greenville’s ‘saint of soup and cornbread’ continues to feed the homeless
Welfare

Greenville’s ‘saint of soup and cornbread’ continues to feed the homeless

Ron Barnett Six years ago, I was assigned to write a Christmas story.
So I hopped in my car and started driving around, looking for the spirit of Christmas.
She has been homeless herself, off and on through the years since I met her.
I tried to convince her to go commercial with her soup and cornbread as a street vendor and do her ministry on the side, but there was too much red tape involved, and she’s not interested in that anyway.
(Photo: Ron Barnett) Wearing a Santa hat, she pulled up in the parking lot across from the Greenville Rescue Mission in a rented car – hers is in the shop with more problems than she can afford to fix right now.
No sooner had she opened her trunk than a half dozen men appeared out of nowhere to gather around for some soup, cornbread and love.
“I love you too,” Pinky replied, hugging him.
Pinky puts a lot of good things in her soup, but she says the main ingredients are “a lot of love and a lot of Jesus.”
Pinky has had her dark times over the years.
She ended up living in her van for a while.

The tax bill should’ve been called The Inequality Exacerbation Act
Social Security Disability

The tax bill should’ve been called The Inequality Exacerbation Act

The gap between the wealthiest and the rest of us is growing, not shrinking.
Yet Congress and a president elected by many who have been left behind economically have passed a tax bill that further widens that gap.
In 1980, the top 1 percent of earners took in 27 times more than those in the bottom 50 percent.
There is growing evidence that economic inequality is a significant drag on the U.S. economy.
Addressing inequality with specific policies to spur job growth, invest in human capital and improve conditions for American workers and their families would be beneficial not only to most of the American people but also for our economy.
According to the Tax Policy Center, in 2018, nearly two-thirds of the tax cuts would go to the top 20 percent of the income distribution.
A more insidious way that this tax bill increases inequality is that it’s not paid for; it adds more than $1 trillion to the national debt over 10 years.
Let’s imagine what policymakers seeking to achieve sustained and broad-based economic growth — growth with benefits that reach all Americans — could do instead of this wrongheaded tax bill.
All the more reason that corporate and investor tax cuts should not be paid for by average Americans.
We need to address America’s needs for investments in infrastructure, science, education and health care.

Is Social Security Disability Taxable?
Social Security Disability

Is Social Security Disability Taxable?

Is Social Security Disability Taxable?.
Most Americans pay Social Security payroll taxes out of their paychecks in order to fund the benefits that go to those who currently collect Social Security.
Yet in a couple of situations, benefits that Social Security pays are indeed taxable for federal income tax purposes.
One of those situations involves Social Security disability, and although many people end up not owing income tax on their disability benefits, some do.
Below, we’ll look at disability benefits both from the SSDI and the Supplemental Security Income programs to determine what, if any, of their benefits you might have to include in your taxable income.
To determine whether you might have to include a portion of your benefits as taxable income on your federal return, you have to take into account both what you get from SSDI and any other income you have.
However, if the amounts are greater than those thresholds, then you might have to include some of your benefits as taxable income.
For the majority of people on receiving disability payments under SSDI, income levels are low enough that their benefits won’t meet these thresholds and therefore won’t be subject to taxation.
The good news is that the IRS never forces you to include SSI payments in your taxable income.
Once you learn how to maximize your Social Security benefits, we think you could retire confidently with the peace of mind we’re all after.

Another Way to Help You Secure Today and Tomorrow
Social Security Disability

Another Way to Help You Secure Today and Tomorrow

Social Security is with you through life’s journey.
While Social Security wants to put you in control of the benefits you receive from us, there may come a time when you need help managing your benefits.
If that time comes, Social Security is there.
Our Representative Payee Program helps millions of beneficiaries who cannot manage their Social Security or Supplemental Security Income benefits.
This can be a child or an adult incapable of overseeing their own funds.
When Social Security receives information indicating someone needs help managing their money and meeting their current needs, we assign someone to help.
After those expenses are paid, your payee can use the rest of the money to pay any past-due bills you may have, support your dependents or provide entertainment for you.
If you live in an institution, such as a nursing home or a hospital, the payee should pay the cost of your care and provide money for your personal needs.
Providing information about a representative payee is another way we help you secure today and tomorrow.
You can learn more by watching our series of training videos on the duties of a representative payee.

What Same-Sex Couples Need to Know
Social Security Disability

What Same-Sex Couples Need to Know

What Same-Sex Couples Need to Know.
Social Security recognizes same-sex couples’ marriages in all states, and some non-marital legal relationships (such as some civil unions and domestic partnerships), for purposes of determining entitlement to Social Security benefits, Medicare entitlement, and eligibility and payment amount for Supplemental Security Income (SSI).
Here are five things you should know about our benefits for same-sex couples: Marital status is important — same-sex couple can receive Social Security benefits when a worker retires, becomes disabled, or dies.
If you‘re entitled to benefits, your spouse and eligible family members might receive benefits, too.
Children may receive benefits — your children or stepchildren could also be entitled to benefits.
When you apply for benefits is important — if you’re married or have entered a non-marital legal relationship, we encourage you to apply right away, even if you’re not sure you’re eligible.
Applying now will protect you against the loss of any potential benefits.
Report life changes right away — you should let us know immediately if you move, marry, separate, divorce, or become the parent of a child.
Don’t wait until we review your benefits to tell us about any changes.
You should report changes right away so benefits are paid correctly.

The Difference between Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income
Social Security Disability

The Difference between Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income

For those searching for help with disability claims, it’s important to understand social security disability benefits. There are two different programs that offer benefits, Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and that article covers only one. This article will give you the proper information about both benefits, […]

Your 2016 Guide to Social Security Disability Benefits
Social Security Disability

Your 2016 Guide to Social Security Disability Benefits

Your 2016 Guide to Social Security Disability Benefits.
It’s worth learning more about it, though, because Social Security offers much more than just retirement benefits.
If you’re disabled, for example, you may qualify for benefits and may want to learn how to submit an application.
There are two Social Security programs that offer benefits to the disabled: the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI).
It can be received by folks who are also receiving Social Security retirement benefits or SSDI benefits.
SSDI, in a nutshell The Social Security Disability Insurance program provides benefits to disabled people who have worked enough to qualify as “insured.”
For starters, they will need to have a medical condition that prevents them from working and that’s long-term, expected to last at least a year or to lead to death.
How much might you receive in benefits if you qualify?
Here are some specific things the Social Security Administration considers as it reviews your application: Whether you’re currently working, and if you are, how much you’re earning: The limits change every year or so.
Many people can simply apply online.