Tag: Take-out

Same old, same old and 6 other takeaways on Trump’s budget
Social Security Disability

Same old, same old and 6 other takeaways on Trump’s budget

Unveiled Monday, the $4.4 trillion spending plan now heads to the GOP-controlled Congress where it’s expected to get a cool reception even from key Republican lawmakers who already rejected many of the same cuts proposed in the president’s 2018 budget plan Trump proposed last year.
In addition, Senate Democrats are likely to fight Trump’s decision not to recommend funding domestic programs as much as a recently negotiated congressional spending deal would allow.
The plan also proposes deep domestic cuts to health assistance, foreign aid, and housing programs and slashes state grants for education, the environment and community redevelopment.
While Trump promised during his presidential run not to cut Medicare, Medicaid or Social Security, he continues to propose changes to those programs.
In addition to seeking major savings in Medicaid for the second year in a row, Trump also wants to find more than $554 billion in Medicare savings.
Programs for poor take a hit As he did last year, Trump is proposing major cuts in safety-net programs.
The budget proposal also axes a grant program for states used to support social services such as child care assistance.
It would also end after two years the private insurance subsidies for people who don’t get coverage through a government program or an employer, while giving states grants to develop their own programs.
More: Trump budget proposes again to cut federal funding for Amtrak in half, which Congress has rejected The budget deal made a difference The congressional budget deal that lifted spending caps known as the “sequester” that Congress imposed in 2011 seems to already be making a difference.
Both defense and non-defense spending would see a boost in Trump’s proposal, though the president is not proposing to spend as much as the caps allow because of the increase to the national debt.

Seven takeaways from Trump’s 2019 budget proposal
Welfare

Seven takeaways from Trump’s 2019 budget proposal

Unveiled Monday, the $4.4 trillion spending plan now heads to the GOP-controlled Congress where it’s expected to get a cool reception even from key Republican lawmakers who already rejected many of the same cuts proposed in the president’s 2018 budget plan Trump proposed last year.
In addition, Senate Democrats are likely to fight Trump’s decision not to recommend funding domestic programs as much as a recently negotiated congressional spending deal would allow.
The plan also proposes deep domestic cuts to health assistance, foreign aid, and housing programs and slashes state grants for education, the environment and community redevelopment.
While Trump promised during his presidential run not to cut Medicare, Medicaid or Social Security, he continues to propose changes to those programs.
In addition to seeking major savings in Medicaid for the second year in a row, Trump also wants to find more than $554 billion in Medicare savings.
Programs for poor take a hit As he did last year, Trump is proposing major cuts in safety-net programs.
The budget proposal also axes a grant program for states used to support social services such as child care assistance.
It would also end after two years the private insurance subsidies for people who don’t get coverage through a government program or an employer, while giving states grants to develop their own programs.
More: Trump budget proposes again to cut federal funding for Amtrak in half, which Congress has rejected The budget deal made a difference The congressional budget deal that lifted spending caps known as the “sequester” that Congress imposed in 2011 seems to already be making a difference.
Both defense and non-defense spending would see a boost in Trump’s proposal, though the president is not proposing to spend as much as the caps allow because of the increase to the national debt.

School lunch shaming: Inside America’s hidden debt crisis
Welfare

School lunch shaming: Inside America’s hidden debt crisis

He’s learned two key truths: Just about every kid loves pizza, and an alarming number of American youngsters still can’t afford a $2.35 lunch, despite the dramatic expansion of free and reduced lunch programs.
All the other kids in the lunch line know what’s going on.
It happens across the country: 76% of America’s school districts have kids with school lunch debt, according to the School Nutrition Association.
Teacher says, ‘I felt I had to do something’ Chris Robinson hopes Texas passes a similar bill to New Mexico’s.
There are 30 GoFundMe campaigns to raise money specifically to pay off school lunch debts so students can get hot meals.
She was one of those kids who was “right above that cutoff line” for free lunch.
The kids have become pawns Schools resort to cheese-sandwich shaming to get lunch debts paid off because they have to fork over the money at the end of the year to cover whatever debt parents don’t pay.
When Antignolo arrived at the Lamar district in 2013, there was over $180,000 in unpaid school lunch debt that year.
A family of four earning under $31,400 can get free lunch for the kids.
Thankfully, some of the money Ishaq raised in her GoFundMe campaign went to pay off the young woman’s debt.